CSU to Unveil Tribute to Creek Indians at Oxbow Meadows

Display of Artifacts (© Graeme Wright/TerraXplorations, Inc./ Ft. Benning, Ga., Cultural Resource Management Branch)

Display of Artifacts (© Graeme Wright/TerraXplorations, Inc./ Ft. Benning, Ga., Cultural Resource Management Branch)

COLUMBUS, Ga. – Columbus State University and the Historic Chattahoochee Commission will unveil the next stop on the Creek Heritage Trail with series of historical educational panels, along with a Creek Indian artifacts display, at 4 p.m. Thursday, May 22 at CSU’s Oxbow Meadows Environmental Learning Center, 3535 South Lumpkin Road. CSU President Tim Mescon will deliver remarks.

The four panels will depict various aspects of the lives of the Creek Indians who called the Chattahoochee River Valley home. The display also will highlight the Creek town of Cusseta, that was located on what is now Fort Benning. Panels will show:

  • The Creek Town of Cusseta
  • Creek Agriculture
  • Cusseta: A Center for International Diplomacy
  • Daily Life in Cusseta

“This event is the culmination of the CSU speaker series, ‘Chattahoochee Valley Indians: Paleo to Present,’ that began at the beginning of the year to bring attention to the community the history of the Creek Indians,” said Victor Salazar, director of CSU’s Ivey Center for Cultural Approach to History. “These permanently installed panels – like those you’d see at a Civil War battle site – will bear descriptions of the life and times of the Creek Indians.”

In addition to the panels, which will be located near Oxbow’s entrance, there will be an indoor display of artifacts that include arrowheads, pottery, buttons, copper works, and pieces of jewelry.

“The incorporation of native American artifacts and history fits well within the scope and vision of Oxbow Meadows ELC,” said Michael Dentzau, executive director of CSU’s Oxbow Meadows. “As with many cultures, the availability of natural resources played a significant role in determining where to settle in this region.  This simply starts to tell one aspect of the story.”

Columbus Water Works and Fort Benning are also partners in this effort.

The Creeks’ history in the area is rich. Ultimately, through a series of treaties and conflicts, U.S. troops, assisted by Georgia and Alabama militia, forcibly rounded up Creeks and sent them to Indian Territory, which later became known as Oklahoma.

Salazar said the Oxbow panels and display will help in developing resources for school systems in the Chattahoochee Valley — wherever the standards find it appropriate. Additionally CSU’s Ivey center is working with the Department of Defense Education Activity at Fort Benning.

The Ivey Center, established at CSU’s College of Education and Health Professions, is a resource center for pre-service and in-service teachers to promote the Cultural Approach to History.

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CSU Army ROTC Battalion to Commission 19 Cadets Tuesday

Army second lieutenants have been wearing gold bars to denote their rank since 1917.

Army second lieutenants have been wearing gold bars to denote their rank since 1917.

COLUMBUS, Ga. – Columbus State University’s Army ROTC Battalion will hold its Spring Commissioning Ceremony at 11 a.m. Tuesday, May 20 in University Hall.

Nineteen cadets will be commissioned as Army second lieutenants.

Maj. Gen. H.R. McMaster, commander of the Army’s Maneuver Center of Excellence at Fort Benning, will be the guest speaker. The event is open to the public. Light refreshments will be served.

One cadet being commissioned Tuesday is Ricky W. Leslie, who was recognized last fall as the Army’s top ROTC cadet. He graduated from Columbus State with a Master of Public Administration degree on May 12 and will report to Fort Jackson, S.C., to take the Army’s Finance Basic Officer’s Leader Course before reporting to his first duty station, at Fort Carson, Colo.

Leslie, of Fayetteville, Ark., surpassed 5,470 counterparts nationwide for the top cadet recognition, compiling a top score on the national Order of Merit List that measures academics, leadership and physical fitness.

Many of the cadets being commissioned Tuesday participated in the Army’s Leadership Development and Assessment Course at Fort Lewis, Wash., last summer. CSU’s contingent was recognized as the top unit among 39 schools from the Southeast.

Other cadets being commissioned are:

  • Julia Alexander, Augusta, Ga.
  • Lanise Barnett, Jonesboro, Ga.
  • Nathan Bohn, Columbus, Ga.
  • Justin Grant, Columbus, Ga.
  • Gregg Janson, Columbus, Ga.
  • Kristy Janson, Columbus, Ga.
  • Samantha Lee, Ft. Mitchell, Ala.
  • William Lewandowski, Phenix City, Ala.
  • Matthew Little, Ft. Benning, Ga.
  • Juan-Pablo Marin, Chula Vista, Calif.
  • Jeremy Miller, Abbeville, Ala.
  • David Mojica-Cruz, Fayetteville, N.C.
  • John Nieberding, Lorton, Va.
  • Marco Presichi, Phoenix, Ariz.
  • Justin Robertson, Longview, Va.
  • Wideline Servius, Pompano Beach, Fla.
  • Jamar Sherman, Phenix City, Ala.
  • Javier Tena, Ft. Benning, Ga.

 

For more on CSU’s Army ROTC program, visit http://ColumbusState.edu/ROTC.

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Theatre Professor New Editor for Theatre Symposium

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Dr. Becky Becker

Becky Becker, professor of theatre, is the new editor for Theatre Symposium, the official journal of the Southeastern Theatre Conference.

Theatre Symposium is a scholarly publication featuring select papers presented at the annual Southeastern Theatre Conference’s Theatre Symposium. This two-day conference focuses on a single scholarly topic related to theatre.

Recent topics include: Comedy as Practiced on Stage, Commedia dell’Arte Performance, Theatre in the Antebellum South, Voice of the Dramaturg, The Re-emergence of the Theatre Building in the Renaissance, and Drama as Rhetoric/Rhetoric as Drama.

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CSU Art Department Hosts 2014 All-State Art Symposium

Art SymposiumCOLUMBUS, Ga. — Columbus State University’s Department of Art will host the 2014 All-State Art Symposium May 16-17 at CSU’s Corn Center for the Visual Arts, 921 Front Ave.

The symposium’s juried exhibition, sponsored annually by the Georgia Art Education Association, presents artwork by Georgia’s top high school art students. Admission is free and tickets are unnecessary. The artwork may be viewed in the Corn Center’s Illges Gallery from noon-6 p.m. on Thursday, May 15; from noon-4 p.m. on Friday, May 16; and from 3-5 p.m. on Saturday, May 17.

The annual All-State Art Symposium is dedicated to promoting and recognizing the creative talents of Georgia high school students. This year, selected high school students from around the state will have the opportunity to take workshops on Saturday in welding, photography, animation, digital concepts, printmaking and various other artistic disciplines taught by faculty from CSU’s Department of Art.

Students and their teachers arriving Friday evening will be able to socialize and take tours of CSU’s Corn Center, followed by a keynote address from Bret Lefler, an associate professor of art at CSU and the GAEA’s Higher Education Teacher of the Year.

For more information, call 706-507-8302 or visit http://ColumbusState.edu/art/artsymposium/.

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Writer: Bill Sutley, University Relations, bsutley@ColumbusState.edu, 706-507-8724
Contact: Kern Clark Wadkins, clark_amanda1@ColumbusState.edu, 706-507-8415

 

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CSU Summer Spectacular Reaches out to Children

Columbus State education majors work with children participating in a Summer Spectacular 2013 learning activity.

Columbus State education majors work with children participating in a Summer Spectacular 2013 learning activity.

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Columbus State University will again offer its popular Summer Spectacular summer enrichment program for children ages 4-11, this year at Downtown Elementary School, 1400 1st Ave.

The spectacular runs from 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays from June 9-July 3.

Started in 2005, the program offers families an alternative, fun learning opportunity while CSU teacher education students gain valuable field experience and more freedom in their approach to curriculum and teaching styles.

This year’s Summer Spectacular theme is Space: Full STEAM Ahead, with STEAM representing science, technology, engineering, the arts and mathematics.

Registration is now open on a first-come, first-served basis. A waiting list will be developed, allowing more children to be added if others drop out. The cost is $40 per week per child, or $140 for all four weeks, with the fee paid in advance. The fees include all supplies, snacks and a T-shirt.

To register, visit http://ColumbusState.edu/coehp/summer-spectacular.php. For more information, contact summerspectacular@ColumbusState.edu or 706-569-2888.

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CSU Talks Computer Science-Defense Efforts in D.C.

CSU representatives meeting with U.S. Rep. Lynn Westmoreland (third from right) this morning are, from left, Heath McCormick, a CSU computer science graduate student; Chuck Turnitsa, director of the GEMS Institute; Wayne Summers, chair of the TSYS  School of Computer Science; Tom Hackett, provost and vice president for academic affairs; and John Lester, assistant vice president for University Relations.

CSU representatives meeting with U.S. Rep. Lynn Westmoreland (third from right) this morning are, from left, Heath McCormick, a CSU computer science graduate student; Chuck Turnitsa, director of the GEMS Institute; Wayne Summers, chair of the TSYS School of Computer Science; Tom Hackett, provost and vice president for academic affairs; and John Lester, assistant vice president for University Relations.

WASHINGTON, D.C. — A team from Columbus State University was in the nation’s capital today to meet with Department of Defense officials and congressional representatives about the work being done by CSU computer scientists to assist with special training at Fort Benning.

Specifically, the meetings are focusing on the Gaming Education Modeling and Simulation, or GEMS, Institute started by CSU in 2010 with a federal grant.

Heath McCormick, a graduate student in CSU’s TSYS School of Computer Science, told officials in Washington today that the system developed through GEMS is a simulation program that teaches young officers “how to think, not what to think.”

Using computers that visually display real-world scenarios faced by the military, in a similar manner as video games, soldiers are better trained to deal with challenging situations. Columbus State is one of four universities nationwide with computer science programs selected by the Army for its soldiers to pursue master’s degrees in gaming, modeling and simulation.

Others from CSU on the trip are Tom Hackett, provost and vice president for academic affairs; Wayne Summers, professor and chair of the TSYS School of Computer Science at CSU; Chuck Turnitsa, director of the GEMS Institute at CSU; and John Lester, assistant vice president for University Relations.

The formation of GEMS with a $1.6 million grant in 2010 built on four years of GEMS curriculum development at Columbus State. In 2006, CSU began offering a computer science degree track in game programming to meet a demand not only in the entertainment industry, but also for designers and programmers of educational computer simulations that inform decision-making in the military, government, corporate management, health care, and other areas. That year, a local defense contractor enrolled some of its employees in the program who ultimately developed a simulation program to train soldiers to inspect vehicles, ask for identification and respond to related scenarios.

In 2008, the university received a $100,000 grant to develop a specially designed computer science curriculum to provide local defense contractors with employees skilled in computer modeling, simulation, and gaming. Simulators are used extensively by all military branches in training for combat.

Learning at the controls of a computer-driven trainer instead of a real tank or plane allows for better training at reduced costs, without wear and tear on actual combat vehicles or systems.

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Theatre Students Picked for Playwriting Festival

HorizonCOLUMBUS, Ga.Two Columbus State University theatre students, Amanda Black and Addie DeVelvis, have been selected to participate in the upcoming New South Young Playwrights Contest and Festival at Horizon Theatre in the Little Five Points area of Atlanta.

Black and DeVelvis were among 20 applicants selected from a large number of submissions.

Horizon Theatre’s free week-long festival, from May 26-31, will include playwriting workshops, seminars and rehearsals with professional theatre actors, directors and playwrights. Participating young playwrights are provided with housing, meals and a travel stipend.

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Spanx Creator to Speak at CSU’s Blanchard Leadership Forum

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Spanx founder Sara Blakely, one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in the World for 2012, has been added as a speaker for Columbus State University’s Jim Blanchard Leadership Forum 2014.

Blakely, 43, whose line of flattering undergarments made her the world’s youngest self-made billionaire, was confirmed as a speaker for the Aug. 25-26 event at the Columbus Iron Works and Trade Center by CSU’s Leadership Institute, which organizes and hosts the forum in partnership with Synovus and TSYS.

A Florida State University graduate, Blakely was working for an office supply company, selling fax machines door-to-door, when she came up with the idea for her hosiery product. It wasn’t until she used her life savings, moved to Atlanta and found a manufacturer that she was able to launch her company from her home in August 2000. Three months later, Oprah Winfrey proclaimed Spanx her favorite product of the year and sales took off.

Her success and self-determination is exactly what makes her an excellent addition to this year’s forum.

“Many of the young professionals I talk with are intrigued and inspired by entrepreneurs,” said Ed Helton, executive director of the Leadership Institute. “They like the independence and the thrill of opportunity. We chose this year’s theme for the Jim Blanchard Leadership Forum (Leadership: Seizing the Opportunity) with that idea in mind. I can think of no one that best exemplifies this than Spanx founder Sarah Blakely.”

Blakely joins an impressive roster of speakers for CSU’s Blanchard Leadership Forum 2014, including:

  • Sheryl Sandberg, chief operating officer for Facebook.
  • Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban, business magnate, investor and philanthropist.
  • Scott Harrison, founder-CEO of charity: water, a nonprofit organization bringing clean, safe drinking water to people in developing nations.
  • Retired U.S. Navy Vice Admiral John R. Ryan, president and CEO of the Center for Creative Leadership, a nonprofit organization focusing on leadership education and research.
  • Author Marcus Buckingham, a leading expert on employee productivity.
  • And Ronald A. Heifetz, senior lecturer and co-founder of the Center for Public Leadership at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government.

For more information on and to register for the Jim Blanchard Leadership Forum, visit http://jblf.org.

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Gov. Deal, First UTeach Graduates Highlight CSU’s May Commencement

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Columbus State University’s May 12 spring commencement will feature the first sitting governor to speak in recent memory and celebrate a first for its innovative UTeach Columbus program.

Nathan Deal, Georgia’s 82nd governor, will deliver his remarks before nearly 800 graduates at the 6:30 p.m. Monday event at the Columbus Civic Center. TSYS CEO Phil Tomlinson, a CSU Foundation trustee, will also be awarded an honorary doctorate.

Among the graduates will be Duncan Cantrell and Timothy Jones, CSU’s first two graduates of UTeach, a one-of-a-kind program that aims to produce more teachers in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering and math. CSU’s faculty in those areas, as well as education, does this by working closely with teaching experts in local schools.

Together, they prepare CSU students for a career in mathematics or science. UTeach allows students to acquire a deep understanding of their fields of study; explore mathematics or science teaching as a career; and develop the knowledge, skills and disposition needed for teaching.

Upon completion of the program, students will earn a CSU degree in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, or mathematics and be qualified to teach in a middle school or high school after passing the appropriate state certification examination.

Cantrell, who has completed his bachelor of arts in biology and secondary education, was the recipient of UTeach scholarships, as well as a Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship, funded through a National Science Foundation grant to CSU.  He also has worked as an intern in the UTeach program, designing and teaching labs in life science to homeschooled middle schoolers. The career objective for the Jackson, Tenn., native is to teach middle school and high school students now that he feels prepare because of UTeach.

“It was very engaging in all of the classes,” Cantrell said of the program. “You have to design and present lessons. Then in almost all the classes — you actually go to elementary, middle and high school classes — and you teach students multiple times a year. It’s very, very hands on.”

Cantrell said he and other UTeach students were taught how to create course content that was inquiry-based, relying more on posing questions or scenarios rather than simply presenting established facts.

“(It’s) very hands on, very much making science accessible and interesting,” he said. “(CSU instructors) practiced what they preached. Classes are designed around do-it-yourself, try it, fail and retry it until you figure it out.”

Jones, a Columbus native, has completed his Bachelor of Science in chemistry and, like Cantrell, was the recipient of UTeach scholarships, as well as a Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship. He, too, worked as an intern in the UTeach program, designing and teaching labs in physical science to homeschooled middle school students on a weekly basis for an entire school year.

Jones said he felt like he had nothing to lose when he entered the program, and it didn’t take long for him to see teaching was where he belonged.

“I remember (student teaching) at Northside High School when I was doing classroom interactions,” he said. “I was teaching them organic chemistry, and they were just eating it up. That’s when I knew I was in the right field. Just how engaged they were learning about chemistry — that makes all the difference.”

Jones said he now intends to pursue a master’s and docorate in education, in addition to teaching. Like Cantrell, he’s also embraced the UTeach emphasis on inquiry-based learning.

“We don’t believe in lecturing,” he said. “We believe in them self-learning, providing them the materials and letting them figure it out. We learned that we’re essentially facilitators, guiding them to the answers.”

For more on CSU commencement, visit http://graduation.columbusstate.edu. For more on UTeach, visit http://ColumbusState.edu/uteach, which features a video of Cantrell describing his experiences in the program.

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$4.95 Million Approved to Renovate CSU’s Arnold Hall

COLUMBUS, Ga. — When Gov. Nathan Deal signed the state’s fiscal year 2015 budget last week, final approval was realized for $4.95 million to renovate Arnold Hall, one of Columbus State’s oldest classroom buildings.

Work on Arnold Hall will begin immediately following upcoming renovation of Howard Hall that’s the result of a $3.95 million state appropriation last year. Howard Hall should close in June and reopen for the fall 2015 semester.

“We are tremendously thankful to the governor, our legislative delegation and the Board of Regents for helping us realize almost $10 million over the last few years for much-needed upgrades to the academic core of our campus,” said Columbus State University President Tim Mescon. “We are following the recommendations of our master plan and trying hard to fund projects with private support that will complement these renovations.”

Renovating Arnold Hall was recommended by the University System of Georgia’s Board of Regents, but final inclusion of this and other minor capital projects was remanded to the legislature for a final recommendation. University officials worked with Columbus-area lawmakers to have the project added to the final budget. Rep. Richard Smith, Rep. Calvin Smyre, Rep. Debbie Buckner, Rep. Carolyn Hugley, Rep. John Pezold, Sen. Ed Harbison and Sen. Josh McKoon all supported the project.

Deal is expected to mention the project when he speaks at Columbus State’s commencement on Monday.

Both renovation projects are part of a long-range plan to revitalize the academic core of Columbus State University’s main campus. With support from Sasaki Associates, a nationally respected planning and design firm, the university envisions a series of projects to enhance CSU’s main campus by improving the quality of the physical and academic environment. Improvements have evolved through careful analysis of university space with a focus on adaptive reuse of outdated and inefficient space not reflective of a contemporary, student-focused, engaged university.

Planners realized that Arnold Hall is cramped, its classrooms are outdated and the building contains limited student support relative to the intensity of its use as a classroom building. Additionally, it is not handicap accessible.

The university is trying to upgrade Arnold and nearby buildings to meet the needs of today’s students and to meet the feel, usability and look created by newer facilities built on campus exclusively with private funds, Mescon said.

“Just as we did with Howard Hall, I’m asking the provost to convene a faculty-led committee to guide the work that will be done on Arnold Hall so we can best meet the needs of our current faculty members and the demands of our future students,” Mescon said.

“Hopefully, next year we will have good news about our next planned project — a major laboratory addition to LeNoir Hall and a new learning commons addition to the main library,” Mescon said. “We’re working feverishly to raise private money to meet the state’s demand that we bank some money locally before a capital project of that size will be considered.”

The fiscal year 2015 budget, which takes effect with the start of the fiscal year on July 1, also includes the largest single-year increase in k-12 funding in seven years and money for some merit and/merit pay increases.

The FY 2015 budget expects the economic growth Georgia has seen since emerging from the Great Recession to accelerate and includes an estimated revenue increase of 3 percent, or $602.5 million, over the amended FY 2014 budget. It also expands affordable access to quality higher education by providing $22.5 million for a 3 percent increase in the award amount for HOPE scholarships and grants.

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Schwob Violin Student to Perform in Carnegie Hall

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Tsai

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Eric Tsai, a freshman in Columbus State University’s Schwob School of Music, has taken first place in an international violin competition, making it possible for him to perform this summer at Carnegie Hall.

A student of Sergiu Schwartz, CSU’s William B. and Sue Marie Turner Distinguished Faculty Chair in Violin, Tsai won the First Prize Award of the recent 2014 New York International Artists Violin Competition, Category B (15 – 17 years old).

Performers from 14 countries entered the rigorous piano, violin and cello competitions The winners will perform in concert on Saturday, June 7 and Saturday, June 28, both at Weill Recital Hall in New York City’s Carnegie Hall.

Tsai, the son of Jason and Fang Tsai of Homewood, Ala., will perform in the June 28 concert.

He’s also the recent winner of the senior violin division of the Music Teachers National Association competition and the 2014 Alabama Symphony Volunteer Council’s Lois Pickard Scholarship Competition. In 2013, he won the 2013 Hilton Head Symphony Orchestra Concerto Competition.

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Creators of Top Arden Submissions Recognized

Arden CoverCOLUMBUS, Ga.Columbus State’s Department of English has announced the 2014 Kocian Award winners, recognizing the top submissions to the Arden, CSU’s literary arts journal, at its recent annual release party.

Named for John Kocian, the first editor-in-chief of the  Arden, the awards recognize outstanding work in four categories of submissions accepted by the journal: poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction and art.

The 2014 Kocian Award winners, all CSU students,  are:

  • Adam White for “The Anatomy of Phineas Gage” in poetry
  • Katherine Hinzman for “The Sonata” in fiction
  • Julie Kuralt for “Fuzzies” in creative nonfiction
  • Erin Bozone for her untitled piece in art

For more information on the Arden, visit http://ColumbusState.edu/arden.

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Columbus State Professors to Present at Washington Seminar on Korea

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Columbus State University professors Kyle Christensen, Tom Dolan, an expert on Korean and Chair of CSU’s Political Science Department, and Kimberly Gill, Director of CSU’s Masters in Public Administration Program will be featured speakers Thursday in Washington, D.C., at a panel discussion called, “South Korean Attitudes Toward the U.S. Rebalance to Asia and Korean Unification,” that is being held by the Korean Economic Institute (KEI).

This event, initially scheduled for February, was been postponed because of a snowstorm.

They will take part in KEI’s first-ever Academic Paper Series program where two reports will be presented, deliberated, and compared. First, Karl Friedhoff from the Asian Institute for Policy Studies will talk about his paper on South Korean views on the U.S. rebalance to Asia. Then CSU’s Kyle Christensen, Tom Dolan, an expert on Korean and Chair of CSU’s Political Science Department, and Kim Gill, Director of CSU’s Masters in Public Administration Program deliver their latest research examining South Korean Ministry of Unification survey and other data on views of unification.

In 2012, Dolan visited South Korea to do public opinion research in the cities of Seoul, Incheon and Busan regarding unification. Because it was done in Korea, and because the surveys were written in Korean, translating and sorting through the data took a lengthy period of time to collect.

“It was focused on attitudes South Koreans have on unification,” Dolan said. “About what they think the obstacles to unification are and particularly seeing if people of different ages have different opinions on it.”

Their paper will be distributed internationally to 5,000 Korean policy people and to the international audience on hand for the panel discussion.

Dolan has worked with the KEI for almost five years. At the time he was initially involved with KEI, its president was Charles L. (Jack) Pritchard, formerly the US’s ambassador and special envoy to North Korea. Pritchard came to CSU September 2009 as the keynote speaker for the Hallock Lecture Series. Additionally, KEI’s academic director, Nicole Finnemann, helped Dolan with a course he was teaching on North Korea and the Six Party Talks in 2010.

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Cougarthon 2014 Raises $2,500 for American Cancer Society

On hand for Friday’s check presentation were, from left, Gina Sheeks, CSU vice president for student affairs; Mitchi Wade, chair of the American Cancer Society’s 2014 Crystal Ball; cancer survivor Rex Whiddon, director of development at CSU’s College of the Arts; Cougarthon staff adviser Anne Brown; student committee members Ansley Phillips and Amber Lanier; and Kimberly McElveen, CSU’s senior director for student engagement.

On hand for Friday’s check presentation were, from left, Gina Sheeks, CSU vice president for student affairs; Mitchi Wade, chair of the American Cancer Society’s 2014 Crystal Ball; cancer survivor Rex Whiddon, director of development at CSU’s College of the Arts; Cougarthon staff adviser Anne Brown; student committee members Ansley Phillips and Amber Lanier; and Kimberly McElveen, CSU’s senior director for student engagement.

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Organizers of Columbus State University’s Cougarthon 2014, a campus-wide dance-oriented fundraising effort to benefit the American Cancer Society, presented a check for $2,500 to the society on Friday.

“It was an honor for the American Cancer Society to have Columbus State University’s participation,” said Denise Dowdy, a local American Cancer Society representative. ”We are so excited and look forward to continuing to grow our relationship with the university and the students.”

About 250 students danced for six hours at CSU’s Student Recreation Center on April 9 as part of the university’s inaugural Cougarthon, which aimed to raise funds and awareness for the cancer society. Food and a wide range of other activities were also part of the evening.

The informal event served as a student-oriented alternative to the black-tie Crystal Ball that the local American Cancer Society held about a month earlier. Both events honored cancer survivors Rex and Lynn Whiddon, who have deep roots at Columbus State.

Plans are already underway for Cougarthon 2015, with organizers advising students to save April 11-12 for the expanded 12-hour event.

Anne Vogler Brown, volunteer programs coordinator at CSU’s Center for Career Development, served as staff adviser for Cougarthon 2014. Students leading the committee organizing the event were Ravhen Maddox, Akilah Anderson and Kameron Griffin.

Other student committee members were Grant Carter, Telea Davis, Lazavia Grier, Jordan Huggins, Aina Kumar, Amber Lanier, Robert Monfort, Katelyn Pawlowski, Ansley Phillips, Andrew Pollock, Kelsey Ray, Cylina Velazquez, Michael Ward and Kaitlyn Woodall.

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CSU Happenings for May 2014

MAY 2 — Baritone Recital

CSU’s Schwob School of Music will host a baritone recital by Alexander Brosseau at 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 2 in RiverCenter’s Legacy Hall. Brosseau, a student of faculty artist Earl Coleman, will perform in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the master’s of vocal performance. Free. For more information, call 706-649-7225 or go to http://ColumbusState.edu/music.

 

MAY 3 — Trombone Recital

CSU’s Schwob School of Music will host a trombone recital by Fletcher Peacock at 11 a.m. Saturday, May 3 in RiverCenter’s Legacy Hall. Peacock, a student of faculty artist Bradley Palmer, will perform in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the master’s of music in Performance. Free. For more information, call 706-649-7225 or go to http://ColumbusState.edu/music.

 

MAY 3 — CSU Tennis

Columbus State’s men’s tennis team, champions of the Peach Belt Conference tournament for the first time in school history, hosts Wingate University in the second round of the NCAA Southeast Regional Tournament at 9 a.m. Saturday, May 3 at the Mary V. Blackmon Tennis Center. If it CSU wins, it plays the winner of the noon Landers-Mount Olive match at 3 p.m. Sunday.

 

MAY 3 — Flute Recital

CSU’s Schwob School of Music will host a flute recital by Leslie Thompson at 1 p.m. Saturday, May 3 in RiverCenter’s Legacy Hall. Thompson, a student of faculty artist Andre Martin, will perform in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the bachelor’s of music performance. Admission is free. For more information, call 706-649-7225 or go to http://ColumbusState.edu/music.

 

MAY 3 — Flute Recital

CSU’s Schwob School of Music will host a flute recital by Aimee Herrmann at 3 p.m. Saturday, May 3 in RiverCenter’s Legacy Hall. Herrmann, a student of faculty artist Andree Martin, will perform in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the bachelor’s of music performance. Free. For more information, call 706-649-7225 or go to http://ColumbusState.edu/music.

 

MAY 3 — Piano Recital

CSU’s Schwob School of Music will host a piano recital by Wei Huang at 5 p.m. Saturday, May 3 in RiverCenter’s Legacy Hall. Huang, a student of faculty artist Alexander Kobrin, will perform in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Artist Diploma Certificate. Admission is free. For more information, call 706-649-7225 or go to http://ColumbusState.edu/music.

 

MAY 4 — CSU Tennis

Columbus State’s women’s tennis team, hosts Erskine College in the first round of the NCAA Southeast Regional Tournament at 9 a.m. Sunday, May 4 at the Mary V. Blackmon Tennis Center. If CSU wins, it plays the winner of the noon Flagler-Georgia College match at 1:30 p.m. Monday.

 

MAY 4 — Tuba Recital

CSU’s Schwob School of Music will host a tuba recital by Jimmy Hendricks at 10 a.m. Sunday, May 4 in RiverCenter’s Legacy Hall. Hendricks, a student of part-time faculty artist Andrew Miller, will perform in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the bachelor’s of music performance. Free. For more information, call 706-649-7225 or go to http://ColumbusState.edu/music.

 

MAY 4 — Percussion Recital

CSU’s Schwob School of Music will host a percussion recital by Joel Castro at 1 p.m. Sunday, May 4 in RiverCenter’s Studio Theatre. Castro, a student of faculty artist Paul Vaillancourt, will perform in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the bachelor’s of music performance. Free. For more information, call 706-649-7225 or go to http://ColumbusState.edu/music.

 

MAY 4 — Percussion Recital

CSU’s Schwob School of Music will host a percussion recital by Lacey Guyton at 2 p.m. Sunday, May 4 in RiverCenter’s Studio Theatre. Guyton, a student of faculty artist Paul Vaillancourt, will perform in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the bachelor’s of music education. Free. For more information, call 706-649-7225 or go to http://ColumbusState.edu/music.

 

MAY 4 — Percussion Recital

CSU’s Schwob School of Music will host a percussion recital by Diana Sharpe at 3 p.m. Sunday, May 4 in RiverCenter’s Studio Theatre. Sharpe, a student of faculty artist Paul Vaillancourt, will perform in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Artist Diploma Certificate. Free. For more information, call 706-649-7225 or go to http://ColumbusState.edu/music.

 

MAY 5 — Flute Recital

CSU’s Schwob School of Music will host a flute recital by Mando Surita III at 3 p.m. Monday, May 5 in RiverCenter’s Legacy Hall. Surita, a student of faculty artist Andree Martin, will perform in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Artist Diploma in flute performance. Free. For more information, call 706-649-7225 or go to http://ColumbusState.edu/music.

 

MAY 5 — Cello Recital

CSU’s Schwob School of Music will host a cello recital by Klayton Hoefler at 5 p.m. Monday, May 5 in RiverCenter’s Legacy Hall. Hoefler, a student of faculty artist Wendy Warner, will perform in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the master’s of music performance. Free. For more information, call 706-649-7225 or go to http://ColumbusState.edu/music.

 

MAY 5 — Cello Recital

CSU’s Schwob School of Music will host a cello recital by Zoltan Csikos at 7:30 p.m. Monday, May 5 in RiverCenter’s Studio Theatre. Csikos, a student of faculty artist Wendy Warner, will perform in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Artist Diploma Certificate. Free. For more information, call 706-649-7225 or go to http://ColumbusState.edu/music.

 

MAY 6 — Piano Recital

CSU’s Schwob School of Music will host a piano recital by Ksenia Kurenysheva at 3 p.m. Tuesday, May 6 in RiverCenter’s Legacy Hall. Kurenysheva, a student of faculty artist Alexander Kobrin, will perform in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Artist Diploma Certificate. Free. For more information, call 706-649-7225 or go to http://ColumbusState.edu/music.

 

MAY 6 — Piano Recital

CSU’s Schwob School of Music will host a piano recital by Liliya Ugay at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 6 in RiverCenter’s Legacy Hall. Ugay, a student of faculty artist Alexander Kobrin, will perform in partial fulfillment of the requirements for bachelor’s of music performance. Free. For more information, call 706-649-7225 or go to http://ColumbusState.edu/music.

 

MAY 6 — Trumpet Recital

CSU’s Schwob School of Music will host a trumpet recital by Nathan Hudson and Edward Suh at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 6 in RiverCenter’s Studio Theatre. Hudson and Suh, students of faculty artist Robert Murray, will perform in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the bachelor’s in music performance and the Artist Diploma Certificate respectively. Free. For more information, call 706-649-7225 or go to http://ColumbusState.edu/music.

 

May 12 — Spring Commencement
CSU will hold its spring commencement at 6:30 p.m. Monday, May 12 at the Columbus Civic Center. Gov. Nathan Deal will deliver the commencement address. TSYS CEO Phil Tomlinson, a CSU Foundation trustee, will be awarded an honorary doctorate. For more information, visit http://ColumbusState.edu/graduation.

 

May 13-15 — Adult Soccer Skills Camp

CSU Continuing Education will hold a three-day soccer skills camp. Led by U.S. Soccer Federation Coach Jay Entlich, also CSU’s women’s soccer coach, will teach skills that will help players, regardless of ability, gain additional comfort and knowledge watching and playing the game. 6:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m. To register, call 706-507-8040.

 

May 13-20 — Art of Meditation I: An Introduction

CSU Continuing Education will conduct a class called Art of Meditation I: An Introduction. Meditation helps to calm the mind, body and spirit. It also fosters a sense of awareness through learning how to focus attention in the moment. Participants will practice being still, recite short meditations, explore introductory breath work and chakras. 6 p.m.-8 p.m. To register, call 706-507-8040.

 

May 21-June 25 — Modern Women Writers

CSU Continuing Education will conduct a class on Modern Women Writers from 6:30 -8:30 p.m. Wednesdays from May 21-June 25. Participants will explore the importance of women’s voices in writing and express themselves as writers in this paired reading and writing course. To register, call 706-507-8040.

 

May 22-24 — Suds! The Rocking 60’s Music Soap Opera

CSU’s Department of Theatre will present Suds! The Rocking 60’s Music Soap Opera from May 22-24 at CSU’s Riverside Theatre Complex. Showtimes are 7:30 p.m. Based on the book (and music and lyrics) by Steve Gundersen, Bryan Scott and Melinda Guild, the production is loaded with good clean fun, bubbling energy and some of the ’60s greatest pop hits. Suds is the story of a young woman and her guardian angels who come to teach her about finding true love in, of all places, a Laundromat, including more than 50 songs of the ’60s, such as “Where the Boys Are,” “These Boots Are Made For Walkin’,” “Respect,” “I Feel Good” and “Do You Want to Know a Secret?” Tickets are $20 for adults, $15 for seniors and active military, and $12 for children 12 and younger. For more information visit http://ColumbusState.edu/theatre.

 

May 29-31— Suds! The Rocking 60’s Music Soap Opera

CSU’s Department of Theatre will present Suds! The Rocking 60’s Music Soap Opera from May 29-31 at CSU’s Riverside Theatre Complex. Showtimes are 7:30 p.m. Based on the book (and music and lyrics) by Steve Gundersen, Bryan Scott and Melinda Guild, the production is loaded with good clean fun, bubbling energy and some of the ’60s greatest pop hits. Suds is the story of a young woman and her guardian angels who come to teach her about finding true love in, of all places, a Laundromat, including over 50 songs of the ’60s, such as “Where the Boys Are,” “These Boots Are Made For Walkin’,” “Respect,” “I Feel Good” and “Do You Want to Know a Secret?” Tickets are $20 for adults, $15 for seniors and active military, and $12 for children 12 and younger. For more information visit http://ColumbusState.edu/theatre.

 

May 26 –Memorial Day Closings

CSU will be closed in observance of Memorial Day. There will be no classes, and offices will be closed.

 

May 31 – Super Saturday

Columbus State’s Coca-Cola Space Science Center will host its Super Saturday from 4 p.m.-9 p.m. at the center, 701 Front Ave., featuring live science demonstrations and activities, ending with a classic sci-fi movie showing. Admission is $4.

 

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Winners Named in 2014 Business Plan Competition at Columbus State

(left to right) Olga Cajaichin, 1st place Nick Kozee, 2nd place Charles Greer, 3rd place Dr. Kirk Heriot

(left to right)
Olga Cajaichin, 1st place
Nick Kozee, 2nd place
Charles Greer, 3rd place
Dr. Kirk Heriot

COLUMBUS, Ga. — An exchange student from Moldova, attending Columbus State University through the Georgia Rotary Student Program, received  $5,000 by winning the 2014 Business Plan Competition through CSU’s Turner College of Business.

Olga Cajaichin impressed the business plan competition judges with her 60-page business plan for Signature Services, LLC, a personalized matchmaking agency in Hungary. She describes the company as providing traditional services with a touch of innovation. The services include matchmaking, real dating and event organizing.

“Each of the seven judges for this year’s competition told me they were very impressed with the quality of the plans submitted,” said Kirk Heriot, CSU’s Ray and Evelyn Crowley Distinguished Chair of Entrepreneurship.

Cajaichin previously earned a double major in finance and accounting at Oxford Brookes University in Hungary before coming to Columbus State University to study business through a scholarship sponsored by the Rotary Club of Columbus. She is certified in marketing communications and speaks fluent English, Romanian and Russian. Spanish and French are secondary languages. Following her studies at CSU, she hopes to remain in the United States.

The second place winner in the business plan competition was Nick Kozee, who wrote about Specialty Services, a proposed company in the construction industry. Third place went to Charles Greer, who wrote about Ascent, a company that makes a new energy bar that he contends tastes better than similar products. The competition recognizes second- and third-place winners with prizes of $1,000 and $500.

The three were among several students honored at a luncheon recently held at Green Island Country Club. The luncheon’s keynote speaker was Richard Smith, a CSU alumnus and the chairman, CEO and president of Realogy Holdings Corp., the leading franchisor of real estate brokerages in the world, including such brands as Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate, Century 21 Real Estate, Coldwell Banker and ERA.

He told students the story of his company’s economic rebound, encouraging them to take risks but to never sacrifice their integrity.

Heriot launched the annual Business Plan Competition in 2010. The competition aims to promote entrepreneurship and development of startups, to build bridges between the university and the Columbus area, and to encourage commercialization of promising ideas.

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English Major Recognized with Scholarship

Hannah Godwin, a sophomore English major from Stockbridge, was awarded the Robert T. Trammell Sr. English Scholarship in the recent CSU College of Letters and Sciences Annual Awards Ceremony.

The $1,500 scholarship recognizes the outstanding academic achievement of an English major at Columbus State University.

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CSU Receives African-American Male Initiative Grant For Its Second Year

COLUMBUS, Ga. – Columbus State University announces it will host the African-American Male Initiative Program for a second year.

Columbus State University is one of 16 state schools that received a $10,000 AAMI pilot grant from the University System of Georgia (USG). The program aims at increasing enrollment and retention of African-American males at the state’s 34 public colleges and universities.

This funding has allowed Columbus State University to initiate the Men About Change (MAC) Program. This is program is designed for African-Americans at CSU and Muscogee County School District. The grant is operated from CSU’s Office of Diversity Programs and Services office. The program is partnered with Muscogee County School District, Collegiate Black Men of Columbus, and the city of Columbus.

Additionally, the African American Male Initiative will hold its 2014 Celebration Banquet from 6 p.m.-8 p.m. tonight in Schuster 130.

The local program enlisted pillars of the community such as Steve Birdine, founder, president, and CEO of Affirmative Action; Charles Holt, actor, singer, and producer; Isaiah Hughley, city manager of Columbus; Honorable Judge Allen, Muscogee County Superior Court judge; and Tom Hackett, provost and vice president of academic affairs at Columbus State. These speakers addressed successful models that have worked to bridge the gap and encourage students to focus on their education.

There will be bimonthly sessions for professional development and 10 team-building opportunities for leadership development for Columbus State male students. New to this year’s program is the addition of a living learning community, partnering with CSU’s Academic Center of Excellence (ACE) tutoring and the university’s orientation team. These methods are used to assist more African American males matriculate at Columbus State University and to increase their overall retention rates.

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CSU Lectures Focus on Chattahoochee Valley History, Native Americans

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Columbus State University will host a three-part lecture in a series titled, “Chattahoochee Valley Indians: Paleo to Present” at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 29 at the Columbus Public Library auditorium, 3000 Macon Road.

The event is free and open to the public. The lecture series serves as a lead-up to the May 21 opening of a Native American exhibit at CSU’s Oxbow Meadows Environmental Learning Center, 3535 S. Lumpkin Road.

Co-sponsors of the lecture series are Fort Benning, CSU’s Ivey Center for the Cultural Approach to History, Oxbow Meadows and CSU’s College of Education and Health Professions.

Topics throughout the series range from prehistoric climate change and lost archaeological sites to Creek Indian removal. Each subject matter expert will offer a half-hour lecture on related topics. Featured April 28 speakers and their topics are:

  • Mike Bunn, executive director, Historic Chattahoochee Commission and author of the book “Battle for the Southern Frontier: The Creek War and the War of 1812,” who will discuss historic Native American villages and influence in the lower Chattahoochee Valley.
  • Billy Winn, a Creek Indian historian and author of the book, “The Old Beloved Path,” will lecture about how Georgia’s push for the removal of the Creek Indians, which became the beginning of the Southern states rights movement.
  • Archaeologist Paul D. Jackson, owner of TerraXplorations, Inc., an archaeological company, who will discuss climate change from 18,000 years ago to present. The discussion will focus on how the climatic changes impacted the landscape, global vegetation and human populations.

 

A 30-minute question-and-answer session with the speakers follows the lectures. For more information, contact Victor Salazar, Ivey Center director, at salazar_victor@ColumbusState.edu or 706-507-8514.

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Panel at CSU Library to Discuss Local Jewish History

These Civil War-era swords were produced by Haiman’s Sword Factory, one of the Columbus area’s largest Jewish-owned businesses during the 1800s. Louis and Elias Haiman started a small tinsmith shop after immigrating here from Prussia in the 1830s. They started producing swords with the start of the war and, by 1863, had over 400 workers and were the Confederacy’s largest sword supplier.

These Civil War-era swords were produced by Haiman’s Sword Factory, one of the Columbus area’s largest Jewish-owned businesses during the 1800s. Louis and Elias Haiman started a small tinsmith shop after immigrating here from Prussia in the 1830s. They started producing swords with the start of the war and, by 1863, had over 400 workers and were the Confederacy’s largest sword supplier.

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Columbus State University is teaming with the Columbus Museum to present a panel discussion of the Chattahoochee Valley’s Jewish history at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 30 on main campus.

CSU Archives, which occupies the third floor of CSU’s Schwob Memorial Library, will host the program in the library’s first-floor forum area at 12:30 p.m.. The discussion is free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided on a first-come basis. Seating is limited.

The program is being presented in conjunction with the Columbus Museum’s ongoing exhibition titled Shalom Y’all: The Valley’s Jewish Heritage, which will be on display through July 13. Museum admission is also free.

Columbus State history students have been interviewing and recording oral histories from longtime members of Columbus-area Jewish congregations as part of this collaboration, to be available later through the CSU Archives. The archives recently received a significant donation of archival materials from Temple Israel, a local Reform synagogue.

Columbus State history majors Christopher Goodrow and Mark Sciuchetti will moderate Wednesday’s panel discussion. Members of the panel will be Jacob Beil, Michael Goldman, Vera Grifenhagen and Jean Kent.

The Columbus Museum’s exhibition documents the presence of Jewish immigrants in the Chattahoochee Valley since the 1830s with images and artifacts from a wide range of public and private collections. Its exhibition focuses on Jewish life in Columbus and nearby communities, including LaGrange, West Point and Eufaula, Ala.

One Jewish immigrant who moved from the Alsace region of France to Columbus in 1912 was Simon Schwob. The tailor opened a clothing store downtown and, later, became a prominent local clothing manufacturer. CSU’s main library and the university’s Schwob School of Music are products of his family’s philanthropy.

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