Computer Science Colloquium Series Wednesday, March 4th, 2009 12:30-1:15 CCT 208

Computer Science Colloquium Series

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

12:30-1:15

CCT 208

“Towards Dynamic Data Driven Simulation for Wildfire Management”

The lecture will be given by Dr. Xiaolin Hu, is an Assistant Professor in the Computer Science Department at Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia. His research interests include modelling and simulation theory and methodology, agent and multi-agent systems, and complex system simulations, including ecological, biological, and social systems. He is also an associate editor for /Simulation: Transaction of The Society for Modelling and Simulation International/.

The recent occurrence of catastrophic wildfires has highlighted the serious threat posed by fires to communities and ecosystems throughout the world. The complexity of wildfire management arises from the dynamic interactions and dependencies among multiple system components, including wildfire behavior prediction, real time data assimilation, and firefighting resource management. To achieve effective wildfire containment, decision-making support tools that integrate all these components are needed. In this talk, I will present an integrated simulation, optimization, and data assimilation framework for wildfire management. The framework uses simulation to predict fire spread behavior, stochastic optimization to compute optimal plans for firefighting resource deployment, and fire suppression simulation to evaluate the deployment plans as well as firefighting tactics. Dynamic data driven simulation is supported as the simulation systems continuously assimilate real time data for better analysis and prediction of wildfire behavior. I will give demonstration of wildfire spread and suppression simulations, and show how the dynamic data driven simulation can improve the simulation results.

Refreshments will be served!!!

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Computer Science Colloquium Series – Wednesday, February 11th, 2009 – 12:30-1:15 – CCT 208

Computer Science Colloquium Series

Wednesday, February 11th, 2009

12:30-1:15

CCT 208

“A Fast Approximate Detector for  W32.Simile Malware”

The lecture will be given by Edna Milgo, a graduate student from TSYS department of Computer Science conducting research on malwares.

Refreshments will be served!!!

W32.Simile is malware that contains a sophisticated transformation (or metamorphic) engine that implements source-to-source code substitution, dead code insertion and code permutation transformations, as well as encryption. The metamorphic engine enables W32.Simile to change its appearance each time it replicates. Metamorphism challenges the time and space resources of traditional signature-based anti-virus scanners, since these scanners have to create, store, and distribute a signature for each of a possibly vast number of malware variants.

Our experiments revealed a range of thresholds that enabled us to discriminate, using just the instruction frequency distributions of programs in our training and testing sets, W32.Simile variants from non-variants. This method is efficient since only disassembly is needed to make a preliminary judgment on whether more elaborate program analyses are needed to ascertain that a suspect program is indeed a variant of W32.Simile.

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Colloquium — “Biometric Technology: Some Technical and Non-Technical Challenges” Jan. 28th–12:30

Wednesday, January 28th, 2009

12:30-1:15

CCT 208

“Biometric Technology: Some Technical and Non-Technical Challenges”

The lecture will be given by Dr. Shamim Khan, faculty member of TSYS Department of Computer Science at Columbus State University.

Refreshments will be served!!!

Personal details stored in a centralized database have always been a source of concern about privacy. People can move home and change bank accounts but biometric information such as fingerprints are unlikely to change. This makes the use of biometric technology even more controversial than traditional identification methods. With the progress being made in biometric technology, it is likely to become more pervasive in many walks of life, leaving some key concerns about its use answered. This presentation will highlight these issues after a briefly discussing some technical aspects of the technology.

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Computer Science Colloquium Series – “Computer Game Design and Development: Forging New Paths and Enriching STEM Education” – Thursday, November 20th

Computer Science Colloquium Series

Thursday, November 20th, 2008

12:30-1:15

CCT 208

“Computer Game Design and Development: Forging New Paths and Enriching STEM Education”

The lecture will be given by Dr. Jon Preston, Associate Professor of Computing and Software Engineering at Southern Polytechnic State University.

Refreshments will be served!!!

Sales figures for the U.S. video game industry (including hardware and software) rose to $18.8 billion dollars in 2007, a 40% increase from $13.5 billion in 2006.  And emergent social and free-to-play markets often dwarf their console and PC counterparts; for example, the Asian-user online social world “Habbo Hotel” boasts 90 million registered users.

Clearly, gaming, media, and online social worlds are a significant component in the field of computing.  While growing in number, programs in computer game design and development are nascent.  There is a significant opportunity to expand program and course offerings to attract new students to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).

This talk will present our recent research into the field of gaming and computing education among undergraduate programs within the US and our local work in developing gaming at Southern Polytechnic State University (SPSU).  “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy,” but all play and no work also leads to problems.  I will present best practices from the International Game Developers Association (IGDA) curriculum guidelines and our findings among successful gaming programs.

Attendees will also learn how we link service, research, and teaching via our gaming group.  This group consists of university faculty, undergraduate students, elementary students and teachers, and non-profit groups.  I will present details of our current work in developing an oceanography simulation that allows students to explore issues of sustainability, ecosystems, and submersible design.  Learning has never been more fun!

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Computer Science Colloquium Series-“Usable Security in Electronic Voting” Wednesday, November 5th

Wednesday, November 5th, 2008

12:30-1:15

CCT 405

“Usable Security in Electronic Voting”

The lecture will be given by Dr. Juan Gilbert, TSYS Distinguished Associate Professor in the Computer Science and Software Engineering Department and a Fellow in the Center for Governmental Services at Auburn University.

Refreshments will be served!!!

Subsequent to the debacle of the 2000 U.S. Presidential election, it became abundantly clear that America’s archaic voting system was in dire need of a major overhaul.  Consequently, Direct Recording Electronic (DRE) voting machines were purchased by several states.  The use of these machines has not been without controversy with respect to security, trust and ease of use.  Professors and security research teams have found several vulnerabilities in current voting technologies. In 2002, the Help America Vote Act (HAVA) was created to provide all citizens equal access to participate in the electoral process, regardless of ability. The Prime III voting system, http://www.PrimeVotingSystem.com , is a secure, multimodal electronic voting system that takes a usable security approach to address security, trust and ease of use.

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Computer Science Colloquium Series

Thursday, October 30th, 2008

12:30-1:15

CCT 208

“A Clustering Algorithm for DNA Microarray Data Analysis”

The lecture will be given by Dr. Junfeng Qu, faculty of Computer Science at Clayton University.

Refreshments will be served!!!

In this talk, Dr. Qu will briefly review biology, bioinformatics, and its relation to data mining. Because DNA Microarray data often provide important information on the diagnosis of cancers, computer scientists and biologists have synergized to analyze DNA Microarray data and develop corresponding algorithms.  Clustering is one of the important approaches to analyze DNA Microarray data. Especially it is very useful to discover functionally related genes and new subclasses of diseases.  A graph-cut based clustering algorithm is proposed, tested with biological data set and compared with some other clustering methods.

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Computer Science Colloquium Series, Wed., Sept. 17th

Computer Science Colloquium Series

Wednesday, September 17th, 2008

12:30 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.

CCT 405

“Using Program Analysis Techniques to Detect Malware: Strengths, Limitations, and Directions for Further Work”

The lecture will be lead by Mohamed R. Chouchane, Assistant Professor at the TSYS Department of Computer Science.

Refreshments will be served!!!

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GetEducated.com Ranks CSU as the Best Online Computer Science University Degree

“Vicky Phillips, GetEducated’s founder, points to the least expensive online masters in the rankings this year, Columbus State University, as an example of the amazing deals available to online students if they take the time to compare online college degree options….“At a cost of more than $18,000 less than the national average, Columbus State University in Georgia is a remarkable bargain buy for learners nationwide,” comments Phillips.” [http://www.geteducated.com/press/prCSRankings0508.asp]

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ICAPP Innovation Grant received

CSU has received an ICAPP Innovation Grant for STEADI: SIMULATION TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION ASSISTING THE DEFENSE INDUSTRY. The project’s goal is to increase Columbus State University’s capacity to provide educational programming that equips students to compete in the innovation-based economy by collaborating with the strategic Homeland Security and Defense Industry to develop sustainable educational programs that meet existing and projected critical workforce needs in Modeling, Simulation and Gaming Technology.

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Activ8 Summer Computer Camps

The TSYS Department of Computer Science will be conducting twelve computer camps for middle school students covering topics ranging from animation and computer gaming to robotics and two computer camps for high school students on computer gaming. See www.activ8er.com for details.

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CSU Hosts Inaugural Lego Robotic Competition

COLUMBUS, Ga. – Columbus State University will host 10 teams from around southwest Georgia in a Lego robotic competition 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 12 at the Cunningham Center. The event, a FIRST Lego League regional competition, will involve children, ages 9-14, testing their skills in Lego-based research and robotics.

The event is free and open to the public and co-sponsored by Columbus State’s TSYS School of Computer Science, Home Depot and Chick-fil-A.

For Saturday’s competition, themed “Smart Move,” the 10-member teams will use Lego Mindstorms kits to design and build automated robots, and use software to program their robots to complete nine different autonomous missions in two and a half minutes. Teams will be judged on robot design and performance, plus the quality of their research and teamwork.

Three teams will advance from the competition at CSU to a 60-team “super regional” event in Warner Robbins. Georgia Tech will host a statewide final competition in February, followed by a FLL-sanctioned worldwide championship event in April at the Georgia Dome and Georgia World Congress Center.

FLL competition coordinators and team coaches typically are educators and parents, said TSYS Senior Enterprise Architect and CSU business management major Frank Braski, who with his wife, Jeanette, is an organizer of the event.

“The rule is, the kids do the work,” Braski said.

The competition’s parent organization, FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) was established in 1989 to inspire children to get involved in science and engineering disciplines. The FLL formed in 1999 when FIRST joined Lego and introduced the Lego robotics set based on the classic yellow Lego robot, which had been popularized by Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In addition to the league for 9-14-year-olds, a junior FLL circuit was established for ages 6-9.

Braski helped organize Columbus’ first FLL team in 2006. “Since then, we’ve grown to several area teams, and this is the first year for an event in Columbus.”

Braski said Saturday’s competition is strengthened by CSU student and faculty volunteers as referees and judges. Participating faculty include computer science professors Wayne Summers, Rodrigo Obando, Neal Rogers, Shamin Khan, David Woolbright, Jianhua Yang and Lydia Ray, plus English professors Barbara Hunt and Susan Hrach. “This is truly a multidisciplinary effort,” said Braski, referring to the literature teachers. “We also have great support from the Association of Computing Machinery and the student organization, Campus Nerds.”

Braski said the FLL effectively engages young students into advanced scientific activity that will prepare them to excel academically through high school and college. “From a practical perspective, the software used to program these robots is made by the same provider, National Instruments, that provides automation software for manufacturing plants around the world,” he said. “Plus, we have several other FIRST teams that these kids can ‘graduate’ into, once they get into high school.”

For more information, call the TSYS School of Computer Science at 706-568-2410 or e-mail braski_francis@ColumbusState.edu.

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