Nuclear Expert to Discuss Russian, Korean Threats

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Former U.S. diplomat Mark Fitzpatrick will offer a close examination of the nuclear threats presented by Russia and other foreign nations Thursday, Feb. 23 during the Col. Richard R. Hallock Lecture Series presented by Columbus State University’s Department of Politics, Philosophy and Public Administration.

A leading expert on nuclear issues, Fitzpatrick served in the State Department for 26 years before joining the International Institute for Strategic Studies to run the institute’s Non-Proliferation and Nuclear Policy Programme. Among other works, he is the author of “Asia’s Latent Nuclear Powers: Japan, South Korea and Taiwan,” “Overcoming Pakistan’s Nuclear Dangers,” and “The Iranian Nuclear Crisis: Avoiding Worst-Case Outcomes.” He holds a master’s degree in public policy from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and a Bachelor of Arts in international relations from the University of Minnesota.

On Thursday, he will discuss “The Greatest Nuclear Threats to the U.S.,” noting how Moscow’s nuclear arsenal — the largest in the world — has long been directed at the U.S. and its allies, and how recent interactions have sparked renewed nuclear sabre-rattling by the Kremlin.

Fitzpatrick, however, will argue that the gravest nuclear challenges are to be found in North Korea and South Asia. Pyongyang’s accelerated nuclear and missile tests demonstrate an intention, or at least an ability, to hit the United States with a nuclear-tipped missile.

The lecture will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Cunningham Conference Center on CSU’s main campus.

For more information, contact Thomas Dolan at 706-507-8727 or Dolan_Thomas@ColumbusState.edu.

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Expert on North Korea Speaks at Columbus State University

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Columbus State University’s Hallock Lecture Series welcomed Mark Tokola, vice president of the Korea Economic Institute of America and an expert on North Korean affairs, to campus Wednesday, oct. 19 to discuss the international community’s response to the country’s recent unsanctioned nuclear tests and missile launches.

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“If there’s one thing we can always rely on from North Korea, it’s that whatever the leadership orders, it will get the world’s attention,” said Tom Dolan, CSU professor of political science and director of the Hallock Lecture Series. “Whether it’s nuclear tests or missile launches, or creative ways to execute people, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea makes the news.”

Presented by CSU’s Department of Political Science, Philosophy and Public Administration, the Hallock Lecture Series was conceived to address key current events and the changing nature of national security concerns for students of political science and foreign affairs. James Clapper, director of U.S. National Intelligence, noted in February during his annual worldwide threat assessment to the Senate Armed Services Committee that North Korea, not Iran, represents the world’s most worrisome nuclear threat.

“Mr. Tokola spoke about ‘Dealing with Kim Jong-un’s North Korea,’ addressing many of the conflicts the world faces with this problematic country,” Dolan said. “Although the U.S. and North Korea have made some progress in the past, especially during the 1990s, this progress has been reversed and North Korea faces pressure not just from the U.S., but from the United Nations and China as well.”

Tokola served 38 years as a Foreign Service Officer in Great Britain, South Korea, Iceland and Mongolia, as well as Baghdad, Brussels, The Hague and Sarajevo, where he received the State Department’s Superior Honor Award for his work on implementing the Dayton Peace Accords. He holds a bachelor’s degree in international relations from Pomona College in Claremont, California and a Master of Laws in European community law from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland.

“CSU was fortunate to have been able to bring in an expert on North Korea for the tenth year of the Hallock Lecture Series on issues of national security,” Dolan said.

The Hallock Lecture Series is funded by the Richard R. Hallock Foundation. Col. Hallock was a much decorated political aide to Gen. Lucius D. Clay in Berlin after World War II, and he was the youngest major to be a battalion commander in Korea.

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Department of State Ambassador to Speak About Threats to U.S. Security

 

COLUMBUS, Ga. — A seasoned diplomat who has spent a lifetime involved in international politics is speaking at Columbus State University Tuesday evening about global threats to U.S. security.

Ambassador Thomas R. Pickering holds the rank of career ambassador, the highest in the U.S. Foreign Service. In a diplomatic career spanning five decades, Pickering has served as U.S. ambassador to the Russian Federation, India, Israel, El Salvador, Nigeria and the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan.

“Ambassador Pickering will be the fourth U.S. ambassador to visit us, and he is certainly the longest-serving and most accomplished,” said Tom Dolan, professor of political science at CSU. “He has agreed to come to Columbus as he returns from the Middle East and before he goes back to Europe later this week, so we are very fortunate that he will be speaking to us.”

In 2012, Pickering chaired the Benghazi Accountability Review Board at the request of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. The review board made recommendations on improving security stemming from the attack on the U.S. Mission at Benghazi, Libya on Sep. 11, 2012.

Pickering earned his bachelor’s degree in history from Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine. He earned his first master’s degree from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University and his second from the University of Melbourne in Australia. He currently serves as vice chairman at Hills and Company, an international trade consulting firm.

Pickering’s talk is part of CSU’s Col. Richard R. Hallock Lecture Series, named after Col. Richard R. Hallock, a decorated career military officer, former personal aide for intelligence to Gen. Lucas Clay in Berlin after WWII and consultant to former Defense Secretary James Schlesinger. The lecture series is funded by the Richard R. Hallock Foundation and coordinated by CSU’s Department of Politics, Philosophy and Public Administration.

Pickering’s lecture begins at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 5 in CSU’s Cunningham Conference Center, 3100 Gentian Blvd. Admission is free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Dolan at Dolan_Thomas@ColumbusState.edu or 706-332-2186.

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Columbus State University To Host ISIS Expert During Hallock Lecture Series

Gartenstein-RossCOLUMBUS, Ga. — Columbus State University will host global terrorist affairs and ISIS expert Daveed Gartenstein-Ross Monday, Oct. 12 during the Col. Richard R. Hallock Lecture Series presented by CSU’s Department of Politics, Philosophy and Public Administration.

Gartenstein-Ross, now a senior fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, was once an Islamic extremist. Pulling from personal experience, he will seek to explain ISIS’s mission to revive the Holy War, discuss the terrorist organization’s sophisticated use of social media rhetoric and examine other current international affairs.

“Not all learning happens in a classroom,” said Thomas Dolan, CSU professor of political science and director of the Hallock Lecture Series. “Our students have the opportunity to listen to an expert. I encourage them to come and get informed.”

Gartenstein-Ross is also CEO of Valens Global, a consulting firm focusing on challenges of violent non-state actors, an assistant professor for Georgetown University’s security studies program and a professor at the Catholic University of America.

His visit begins the ninth year of the Hallock Lecture Series, named after Col. Richard R. Hallock, a career military officer and aide to former Defense Secretary James Schlesinger.

The lecture begins at 7:30 p.m. in CSU’s Cunningham Center. Admission is free and open to the public.

For more information, contact Dr. Dolan at 706-507-8727 or Dolan_Thomas@ColumbusState.edu.

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Columbus State Professors to Present at Washington Seminar on Korea

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Columbus State University professors Kyle Christensen, Tom Dolan, an expert on Korean and Chair of CSU’s Political Science Department, and Kimberly Gill, Director of CSU’s Masters in Public Administration Program will be featured speakers Thursday in Washington, D.C., at a panel discussion called, “South Korean Attitudes Toward the U.S. Rebalance to Asia and Korean Unification,” that is being held by the Korean Economic Institute (KEI).

This event, initially scheduled for February, was been postponed because of a snowstorm.

They will take part in KEI’s first-ever Academic Paper Series program where two reports will be presented, deliberated, and compared. First, Karl Friedhoff from the Asian Institute for Policy Studies will talk about his paper on South Korean views on the U.S. rebalance to Asia. Then CSU’s Kyle Christensen, Tom Dolan, an expert on Korean and Chair of CSU’s Political Science Department, and Kim Gill, Director of CSU’s Masters in Public Administration Program deliver their latest research examining South Korean Ministry of Unification survey and other data on views of unification.

In 2012, Dolan visited South Korea to do public opinion research in the cities of Seoul, Incheon and Busan regarding unification. Because it was done in Korea, and because the surveys were written in Korean, translating and sorting through the data took a lengthy period of time to collect.

“It was focused on attitudes South Koreans have on unification,” Dolan said. “About what they think the obstacles to unification are and particularly seeing if people of different ages have different opinions on it.”

Their paper will be distributed internationally to 5,000 Korean policy people and to the international audience on hand for the panel discussion.

Dolan has worked with the KEI for almost five years. At the time he was initially involved with KEI, its president was Charles L. (Jack) Pritchard, formerly the US’s ambassador and special envoy to North Korea. Pritchard came to CSU September 2009 as the keynote speaker for the Hallock Lecture Series. Additionally, KEI’s academic director, Nicole Finnemann, helped Dolan with a course he was teaching on North Korea and the Six Party Talks in 2010.

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Columbus State Professors Present at Washington Seminar on Korea

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Three Columbus State University professors will be special guests in Washington, D.C. next week as featured participants in a panel discussion toward North Korea-South Korea unification.

Korea expert Tom Dolan, chair of CSU’s Department of Political Science and Public Administration, will be joined by Kyle Christensen, an assistant professor in the department and director of CSU’s Social Research Center, and Kimberly Gill, also an assistant professor there and director of CSU’s Master of Public Administration program.

They will be featured speakers on Feb. 13 in a panel discussion at the Korea Economic Institute, a not-for-profit, educational organization affiliated with a Seoul research institute. Their presentation and discussion will focus on “South Korean Attitudes Toward the U.S. Rebalance to Asia and Korean Unification.”  The event will be live-streamed on the KEI website (keia.org) and may viewed online afterward.

The CSU faculty will take part in KEI’s Academic Paper Series program, where two reports will be presented, deliberated, and compared. First, Karl Friedhoff of the Asian Institute for Policy Studies will discuss his paper on the same topic. The CSU group will then share their latest research, which resulted from Dr. Dolan’s field work in South Korea and North Korea in 2012.

In 2012, Dolan visited South Korea to do public opinion research in the cities of Seoul, Incheon and Busan regarding unification. Because the surveys were written in Korean, translating and sorting the data took more time than usual.  “It was focused on attitudes South Koreans have on unification,” Dolan said. “About what they think the obstacles to unification are and particularly seeing if people of different ages have different opinions on it.”

Their paper will be distributed internationally to about 5,000 Korean policy followers, as well as the international audience expected to attend the panel discussion.

Dolan has worked with the KEI for almost five years. KEI’s president during Dolan’s initial visit was Ambassador Charles L. “Jack” Pritchard, former special envoy for negotiations with North Korea. Pritchard came to Columbus in September 2009 as the keynote speaker for CSU’s Hallock Lecture Series. Later, KEI’s academic director, Nicole Finnemann, helped Dolan with a 2010 course he was teaching on North Korea and the Six-Party Talks related to North Korea’s nuclear program.

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Columbus State’s Hallock Lecture Features Nuclear Security Expert

Dr. Duyeon KimCOLUMBUS, Ga. — A nuclear non-proliferation and security expert will discuss “International Nuclear Security in the 21st Century” at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 11 at Columbus State University’s Cunningham Center.

The speech by Duyeon Kim, deputy director of nuclear non-proliferation at the Center for Arms Control and Non-Proliferation, is part of CSU’s Col. Richard R. Hallock Lecture Series. The public is invited to attend the free lecture in Cunningham’s Blanchard Hall.

As deputy director, Kim has written for major publications, including the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists and the World Politics Review. Kim has also been interviewed by CBS, BBC, AFP TV, South Korea’s KBS, South Korea’s Arirang TV and China’s Xinhua News Agency while being quoted by the Agence France-Presse news agency, Korea Herald, Nature, Korea Times, JoongAng Ilbo, Seoul Shinmun and Asia Times.

Before joining the center, Kim was a career diplomatic and security journalist, serving as foreign ministry correspondent and Unification Ministry correspondent for South Korea’s Arirang TV, based in Seoul. Her stories mainly covered North Korea’s nuclear programs, the Six Party Talks, inter-Korean relations, the Korea-U.S. alliance, South Korean diplomacy, U.S. foreign policy and the United Nations. Kim has sat down with world leaders on countless occasions interviewing such dignitaries as UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and UN agency chiefs, former Indonesian President Megawati Soekarnoputri and senior officials across the world.

Kim holds an M.S. in foreign service, concentrating in international relations and security from the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service and a B.A. in English literature from Syracuse University.

Her lecture is made possible by a gift from the Richard R. Hallock Foundation, and coordinated by Columbus State’s Department of Political Science and MPA Program. Hallock was a much-decorated paratrooper in World War II, a personal aide for intelligence to Gen. Lucius D. Clay, who oversaw the post-war occupation of Berlin, and the youngest major to be a battalion commander in Korea.

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Columbus State Political Scientist Surveys Koreans on Unification

The governments of North Korea and South Korea may be discussing the possibility of reuniting, but the recent Korean flag incident at the Summer Olympics in London indicates it’s still a sensitive topic, a Columbus State University professor says.

North Korea’s women’s soccer team left the field for an hour during their opening London 2012 match on July 25 after South Korea’s flag was mistakenly displayed next to their names on an electronic scoreboard. Tom Dolan, CSU’s political science chair, said the protest probably struck a familiar chord for some Georgians.

“Didn’t a governor (Roy Barnes) lose an election because of a changed flag?” he said. “We have people here still flying the (Confederate) flag. It (the Korean flag mix-up) was an emotional issue.”

Dolan knows the two Koreas well. On the screen of his desktop computer is a photo from his summer 2012 trips to both countries. There’s Dolan, standing in North Korea with the border of South Korea a few feet behind him, marked by a thin dark line of tiles showing the nations’ border. It would be easy to imagine Dolan walking freely from one country to the other — maybe even straddling the border for kicks.

But that’s easier said than done.

The border is guarded by armed soldiers on both sides who would frown on border-crossing hijinks. But the main reason is that communist North Korea and democratic South Korea are as diametrically opposed ideologically as possible. Yet the idea of unification persists, and it led Dolan there to do research about the possibility of creating one Korea for the first time in 67 years.

“Both countries insist that they want it,” Dolan said. “A friend of mine in (South) Korea now is director of research for Korean unification.  He works for a government entity whose job it is to figure out how to do it. But both sides see unification very differently.”

North Koreans view the divided peninsula as unnatural. For them, putting the two halves together constitutes reunification. But most South Koreans, except those in their 70s and 80s, never knew a unified Korea, so South Koreans view the joining of the nations as unification, representing something new.

“North Korea says it will be a returning to the old way,” Dolan said. “South Koreans say it is a new game. It’s all semantics.”

Dolan, a former Navy intelligence officer, understands the repercussions of differing perceptions. He was a student in the national security affairs track at Navy Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif., when his assignment officer in Boston, speaking with a Boston accent, broached the idea of Dolan going to Korea. But that’s not what Dolan heard.

“I thought he called asking me about my career,” Dolan said. “He thought I said I was interested in Korea.”

Dolan acknowledged he doesn’t speak the Korean language as well as during his military days, but he remembered enough to conduct his 2012 research. During two summer trips, Dolan conducted 250 face-to-face interviews on reunification. The surveys were conducted in Korean so as to facilitate more authentic data from a larger pool.

“A lot of Americans want to do research like this,” Dolan said. “But they want to do it in English, so you’ve got to find folks who speak English.  That automatically eliminates the folks you really want to deal with.”

Dolan’s preliminary findings are that support for unification is waning. He also believes older North Koreans are the ones who want reunification most, and they want it fast, before they die.

“Younger South Koreans live a very affluent lifestyle and realize unification is going to cost a lot,” Dolan said. “And they say, ‘Who’s going to be paying for this? Not the North Koreans.’ They realize they are going to be paying for it, so many of the younger South Koreans do not want rapid unification. They don’t think of the people of North Korea as family. They think of them as people who fire artillery shells and launch missiles at them.”

Dolan, who moved his family to Korea and adopted a daughter during his military stay there, favors reunification because he believes it would benefit people of both nations. But he’s not sure it will ever happen if left solely to those two governments.

“The two sides see unification so differently,” he said. “South Korea would like to absorb the north, get rid of all vestiges of communism, and then not have to worry about a military threat. North Korea says, `Our society is fine the way it is. We don’t want American imperialists to rule us the way they rule South Korea.’ It is an interesting time to be there.”

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Mideast Expert Delivering Hallock Lecture

Jonathan SchanzerCOLUMBUS, Ga. – A Middle East expert will discuss “Leveraged Diplomacy or Duplicity: The Palestinian Statehood Campaign” at 7:30 p.m. March 20 at Columbus State University’s Cunningham Center. 

The speech by Jonathan Schanzer, vice president of research for the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, is part of CSU’s Col. Richard R. Hallock Lecture Series. The public is invited to attend the free lecture in Cunningham’s Blanchard Hall.

Schanzer is the author of Hamas vs. Fatah: The Struggle for Palestine, a 2008 book that chronicles the Palestinian civil war, and Al-Qaeda’s Armies: Middle East Affiliate Groups & the Next Generation of Terror, a 2004 book that offers a critical overview of the Middle East groups with ties to Osama Bin Laden.

 

A former terrorism finance analyst at the U.S. Department of the Treasury, Schanzer played a key role in pinpointing financiers of terrorism. He has also worked for other U.S.-based think tanks: the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, the Jewish Policy Center and the Middle East Forum.

He earned his doctorate from Kings College London, where he wrote his dissertation on the U.S. Congress and its efforts to combat 20th Century terrorism. Schanzer also earned a B.A. from Emory University, a master’s from Hebrew University of Jerusalem and studied Arabic at the American University in Cairo in 2001.

His lecture is funded by the Richard R. Hallock Foundation and coordinated by Columbus State’s Department of Political Science and MPA Program.

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Photo: Jonathan Schanzer (higher-resolution original)

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Economic Crimes Expert to Give Hallock Lecture at CSU Alma Mater

Joe ParkerCOLUMBUS, Ga. — Columbus State alumnus Joe Parker, a 30-year federal law enforcement specialist, is the next speaker in the university’s Hallock Lecture Series.

Parker, recently an economic crimes advisor for the U.S. Treasury, will speak on “The Money Laundering-Terrorism Connection in Central America” at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 27 in the Cunningham Center’s Blanchard Hall.

Introduced by CSU in 2007 to address issues of national security,  the lecture named for the late Col. Richard R. Hallock is free and open to the public.

Parker, a 1992 political science graduate who later earned a Master of Public Administration from CSU, will share insight from his recently completed assignment for the U.S. Treasury in Mexico City, where he managed the Office of Technical Assistance’s execution of the Merida Initiative. The $465 million U.S. Department of State effort provides resources for long-term improvement of U.S.-partner security agencies in Mexico and Central America.

A Dallas native, Parker started his career in international banking before working for the FBI, U.S. Secret Service and U.S. Customs Service. With Customs, he served as representative to the General Secretariat of the International Criminal Police Organization (ICPO-Interpol) in France, where he was assigned to the drugs subdivision as the cocaine desk officer. He assumed his most recent post in 2002 after earning his CSU degrees and teaching criminal justice as a doctoral teaching fellow at Sam Houston State University and at the University of Texas at Tyler.

Parker’s lecture is funded by the Richard R. Hallock Foundation and co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science and MPA Program.

Hallock was a much-decorated paratrooper in World War II, a personal aide for intelligence to Gen. Lucius D. Clay, who oversaw the post-war occupation of Berlin, and the youngest major to be a battalion commander in Korea.

 

For more information, call 706-507-8727.

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Photo: Joe Parker
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Columbus State to Host Rep. Westmoreland in Open Forum

COLUMBUS, Ga. – U.S. Rep. Lynn Westmoreland will speak on current government issues and answer audience questions from 3-4 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 25 in Columbus State University’s International House at University Avenue and Clearview Circle.

Westmoreland, R-Newnan, was first elected in 2004 to the U.S. House of Representatives and re-elected to a fourth term in 2010. He serves on the House Financial Services Committee and the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.

He represents Georgia’s third district, stretching from southern metro Atlanta to Columbus. Before entering Congress, the Fayette County native served 12 years in the Georgia House of Representatives.

The event is free and open to the public and presented by Pi Alpha Alpha and Pi Sigma Alpha, Columbus State’s political science national honor society student chapters.

For more information, call the Department of Political Science and MPA Program at 706-507-8700.

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Columbus State to Host Rep. Westmoreland in Open Forum

U.S. Rep. Lynn WestmorelandCOLUMBUS, Ga. – U.S. Rep. Lynn Westmoreland will speak on current government issues and answer audience questions from 3-4 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 25 in Columbus State University’s International House at University Avenue and Clearview Circle.

Westmoreland, R-Newnan, was first elected in 2004 to the U.S. House of Representatives and re-elected to a fourth term in 2010. He serves on the House Financial Services Committee and the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence.

He represents Georgia’s third district, stretching from southern metro Atlanta to Columbus. Before entering Congress, Westmoreland served 12 years in the Georgia House of Representatives.

The event is free and open to the public and presented by Pi Alpha Alpha and Pi Sigma Alpha, Columbus State’s political science national honor society student chapters.

 

For more information, call the Department of Political Science and MPA Program at 706-507-8700.

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CSU’s Dolan Completes Fellowship Study on Terrorism

Dolan in IsraelCOLUMBUS, Ga. – Columbus State University political science professor Tom Dolan participated in a June 11-22 program focused on the threat of terrorism to democracy.

As a 2011-2012 Academic Fellow with the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, Dolan traveled to Israel for an intensive series of lectures by academics, diplomats and military officials from India, Israel, Jordan, Turkey and the United States, as well as field trips to military, police and immigration facilities throughout Israel.

The studies included emerging technologies of terrorist organizations.

“In addition to coursework at Tel Aviv University on topics such as ‘The Contemporary Jihadi/Salafi Movement: Religious Origins and the Role of Jurisprudence’ and ‘The Arab Spring and the Implications of a Poly-Nuclear Middle East,’ I visited training events with many elite units of the Israeli Defense Forces and National Police Force,” said Dolan, chair of the Department of Political Science and MPA Program. “I will apply some of this training to courses  – American Defense Policy (POLS 4177) and National Security Policy (POLS 7177) – I’ll teach in the fall semester.”

FDD is a Washington-based non-profit, non-partisan think tank that seeks to educate Americans about the terrorist threat to democracies worldwide. The organization also produces independent analyses of global terrorist threats that explore the historical, cultural, philosophical and ideological factors that drive terrorism and threaten the individual freedoms guaranteed within democratic societies. 

Dolan, who earned his master’s degree in national security affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif., was a Naval flight officer and also served in Army and Air Force commands. 

This month, he is directing a CSU Study Abroad course on “Islam in Europe“ in Oxford, England.

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Photo:  Tom Dolan in Jerusalem’s Old Quarter with the Dome of the Rock, a landmark mosque, behind him.

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CSU’s Dolan Selected for Exclusive Fellowship in Terrorism Studies

Thomas P. DolanCOLUMBUS, Ga. – Columbus State University political science professor Tom Dolan has been selected to participate in a unique program that focuses on the threat of terrorism to democracy.

As a 2011-2012 Academic Fellow with the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies, Dolan will travel to Israel for an intensive June 11-22 series of lectures by academics, diplomats and military officials from India, Israel, Jordan, Turkey and the United States, as well as field trips to military, police and immigration facilities throughout Israel.

The goal is to educate participants about terrorism and how democratic states combat the threat.

FDD is a Washington-based non-profit, non-partisan think tank that seeks to educate Americans about the terrorist threat to democracies worldwide. The organization also produces independent analyses of global terrorist threats that explore the historical, cultural, philosophical and ideological factors that drive terrorism and threaten the individual freedoms guaranteed within democratic societies.

Dolan, who earned his master’s degree in national security affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif., was a Naval flight officer and also served in Army and Air Force commands. He is currently interim chair of CSU’s Department of Political Science and MPA Program.

In July, he will direct a CSU Study Abroad course on “Islam in Europe“ in Oxford, England.  He will be teaching courses on American Defense Policy and National Security Policy at Columbus State in the fall semester.

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CSU Geology Professor to Address Global Ocean Pollution

COLUMBUS, Ga. – Although 2010’s Deep Horizon oil spill drew worldwide attention, the breadth and implications of ocean pollution are underappreciated.

This assertion by Columbus State University geology professor William Frazier is at the core of his lecture, “A Sea of Troubles: Polluting the Global Ocean,” 6:30 pm. Thursday, Feb. 17 in CSU’s Center for Commerce and Technology auditorium.

The program is free and open to the public.

“The ocean comprises three-quarters of the Earth’s surface, but for most of us, our only contact with it is a trip to the beach,” Frazier said. “Disasters like the Deep Horizon oil spill mar the beauty of the coast and so make headlines, but far greater and more disturbing problems roil the waters of the deep.”

Frazier’s lecture will cover other, lesser-known examples of ocean pollution, including the “great garbage patches,” dead zones in coastal waters, toxic chemicals and poisoned seafood, and ocean acidification.

“I will also try to show that society’s response to these problems will depend critically on both the internal policies of world’s nations as well as on cooperative, international efforts,” Frazier said.

The program is part of the Environmental Policy Lecture Series presented by CSU’s Department of Political Science and MPA Program.

Environmental policy represents one of four degree tracks in the university’s master of public administration program. The other tracks are government administration, health services administration and justice administration. For more information, call 706-562-1697.

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Columbus State Hosts High School Model U.N.

COLUMBUS, Ga. – Columbus State University’s Department of Political Science and MPA Program will host nearly 300 local students for the annual Columbus Area High School Model U.N. Wednesday and Thursday, Nov. 17-18 at CSU’s Cunningham Center, 3100 Gentian Blvd.

Students and their teachers from Northside, Shaw, Columbus, Brookstone, Hardaway and Spencer high schools will check in and gather for a 4:45-7:30 p.m. opening session on Wednesday.

On Thursday, the students, as delegates to 173 different countries, will explore and debate issues related to environmental problems, human rights, economic development and globalization. A 5-7 p.m. awards ceremony closes the event.

More than 20 Columbus State political science majors will help oversee the proceedings and assist their younger counterparts.

Thursday Model U.N. Schedule
• 8:30-11:30 a.m. – Morning Session
• 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. – General Assembly
• Noon-1 p.m. – Economic and Social Council
• 12:15-1:15 p.m. – Security Council
• 12:30-1:30 p.m. – International Summit
• 4-5 p.m. – Dinner Recess
• 5-7 p.m. – Awards ceremony

For more information, call 706-507-8700.

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Environmental Expert Recounts Implications of Groundbreaking Cleanup of Columbus Site

COLUMBUS, Ga.. — Georgia Power’s environmental affairs manager Darahyl Dennis will discuss how cleanup of a Columbus site revolutionized environmental policymaking regarding ground contamination in a presentation, “Toxic Rock: What is it? Why it is Important,” at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 14 in the Studio Theatre at Theatre on the Park on Columbus State University’s RiverPark campus.

Admission is free and open to the public.

Dennis, a 1974 Columbus State biology graduate, will describe how, in 1992, a method referred to as in-situ solidification was used in cleaning up the site of the former Columbus Manufactured Gas Plant, and how this pioneering method has subsequently and effectively been applied around the world.

Redeveloped as part of the Chattahoochee Riverwalk, the four-acre site was home to one of more than 1,500 manufactured gas plants around the United States that contaminated the ground after operating from the mid-1800s through the early- to mid-1900s.

More broadly, Dennis will outline how the Columbus case relates to the legal, regulatory and physical issues policymakers deal with regarding environmental contamination in the process of urban redevelopment.

Dennis’ presentation is part of a series of environmental policy lectures presented by CSU’s Department of Political Science and MPA Program. For more information, call 706-507-8704.

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New Social Research Center Aims to Strengthen Columbus State’s Ties to Community

COLUMBUS, Ga .— Columbus State University expects to offer better quality, lower cost research and data services to local governmental and non-profit agencies through its new Social Research Center.

“We already have extremely qualified faculty in place who are eager to develop partnerships that will benefit community organizations and ultimately benefit our service region,” said Greg Domin, chair of CSU’s Department of Political Science, which will house the new center.

Among the services to be offered by faculty from throughout Columbus State are:

  • Statistical consulting
  • Geographic information services (including mapping and planning)
  • Program evaluation
  • Survey research
  • Focus groups

Domin said the center will offer services that are vastly less expensive than agencies developing similar capabilities and at a fraction of the cost of hiring consulting firms.

Kyle Christensen, assistant professor of political science, will be the center’s initial director, offering office and laboratory space to assist faculty research efforts from its Arnold Hall 210 home on main campus. The center will encourage networking among faculty to develop interdisciplinary research groups and work with community partners.

“The Social Research Center exists to provide reasonably priced research services to community partners through a program fostering faculty research agendas and undergraduate research throughout the campuses of Columbus State University,” Christensen said.

Columbus State students will benefit from more opportunities to master a wide range of research techniques across represented disciplines.  Students will get hands-on experience working directly with faculty research projects and collaborating with faculty on services for community partners. Long-range plans include a certificate program for students and research fellowships

Provost Inessa Levi proposed the center a year ago as another means to address parts of the university’s strategic plan that encompass partnering with the community, boosting external funding and offering the best undergraduate and graduate education to meet student and community needs.

“Engaged scholars serve as the backbone of the university,” Levi said. “The Social Research Center will greatly augment our faculty’s research efforts, keeping students on the cutting edge of the disciplines.  The center complements CSU’s efforts to continue to build strong ties with our surrounding community.”

Beyond communicating a vision for the center, Levi was also able to allocate space and financial support to get it off the ground, Domin said

“With the encouragement of the provost and President (Tim) Mescon, the Social Research Center will help solidify Columbus State University’s reputation as a leader in experiential learning, civic engagement, and servant leadership,” Domin said.

For more information on the Social Research Center, contact Christensen at 706-562-1483 or christensen_kyle@ColumbusState.edu.

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Ambassador to Discuss U.S. Mission in Afghanistan

COLUMBUS, Ga. – Ronald E. Neumann, recently the U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan, will talk about the U.S. military occupation of that nation in a Hallock Lecture Series program, 7 p.m. Monday, March 1 in Columbus State’s University Hall auditorium. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Ronald E. Neumann Neumann, right, recently authored The Other War: Winning and Losing in Afghanistan, through which he recounts the problems the U.S. has caused and encountered in the Afghanistan conflict. His insight is from his 2005-2007 service as ambassador to that country and his current role as president of the America Academy of Diplomacy in Washington.

A career member of the Senior Foreign Service, Neumann also served in Iraq in 2004 with the Coalition Provisional Authority and as Embassy Baghdad’s principal interlocutor with the Multinational Command, where he was deeply involved in the political activity of the military.

Earlier in his career, he served as an Army infantry officer in Vietnam and holds a Bronze Star, Army Commendation Medal and Combat Infantry Badge. In Baghdad, he was awarded the Army Outstanding Civilian Service Medal.

On the morning of the Hallock Lecture, Neumann will speak to a class of officer candidates at Fort Benning. He is listed on the “OCS (Officer Candidate School) Hall of Fame” display at the National Infantry Museum.

Neumann’s CSU lecture is funded by the Richard R. Hallock Foundation and co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science and MPA Program.

Col. Richard R. Hallock was a much-decorated paratrooper in World War II, a personal aide for intelligence to Gen. Lucius D. Clay in Berlin after the war and the youngest major to be a battalion commander in Korea. For more information, call 706-565-7875.

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Students Witness Washington Politics, Government in Person

COLUMBUS, Ga. – While many of their peers relaxed through the final week of a holiday break from classes, a group of Columbus State University students engaged and networked with leaders at the nation’s capital.

Led by Associate Professor of Political Science Greg Domin, eight students participated in a Jan. 3-8 academic seminar, “Congress and the Obama Presidency,” hosted by the Washington Center on Internships and Academic Seminars as part of its Inside Washington series.

“The seminar presented a great opportunity to experience firsthand Washington, D.C., politics and government in action,” said Domin, chair of the political science department at CSU.

CSU students (last two rows) listen to the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff during a C-SPAN televised speech. The program included lectures by nationally respected academics and major speaker events. The group attended Adm. Mike Mullen’s Jan. 7 speech about U.S. strategy in Iraq, Afghanistan and the Middle East; the recent events in Yemen; and what U.S. military forces might look like after the end of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, outlined some of the challenges facing the military, including the Afghanistan “extended surge” and withdrawing from Iraq. The event, televised live by C-Span, also featured remarks by former Deputy National Security Adviser for Counterterrorism Juan Zarate and former U.S. Rep. Mickey Edwards (R-Okla.).

The students also engaged in site visits to governmental organizations, think tanks, embassies and congressional offices. For example, the CSU group met with Alex Sheff, an aide to Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich. to discuss the process of legislating health care reform. They also discussed the issue with perspective from the Republican side with Georgia Sen. Saxby Chambliss’ aide, Charlie Harman.

The seminar provided “a very rewarding opportunity to delve into the forces in play in our government,” said political science major Amber Dees, one of the participating CSU students. I have a richer and fuller understanding now of the concepts I have been learning in classes over the past two years,” she said.

Dees’ classmate, political science major, Christian Torijano, concurred, saying he gained “a behind the scenes understanding of how business is actually conducted in Washington… The lectures here in Washington are given by some of the best academic minds in the field of political science, and the guest speakers are true Washington insiders with eye-opening insight into the issues at hand.”

Torijano and Dees’ fellow participants from CSU were political science majors Ashley Kendricks, James Cochran IV and Kristopher Farrar; management information systems major Rose Kennedy; MPA candidate Robb Nichols; and history education major Vanessa Lewis.

“For a non-political science major, this has been a very significant and highly valuable experience for me,” Lewis said. “It’s an honor to listen to the speakers who are so intelligent and informed about today’s politics and participate in the site visits in order to gain a first-hand account of Washington and how it works.”

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