CSU Professor’s New Book Leads to Research Grant for LBJ Library

Joe MillerCOLUMBUS, Ga. — Columbus State University Assistant Professor of English Joe Miller will conduct research in Lyndon B. Johnson’s Presidential Library this August thanks to a $1,560 Moody Research Grant.

Miller’s research will focus on the understanding and treatment of alcoholism. It is the topic of his new book, “US of AA: Science, Alcoholism, and the Rise and Fall of the Twelve Steps,” which was recently accepted for publication by Chicago Review Press, one of the nation’s leading independent publishers.

“I am excited and grateful for the opportunity to travel to Austin to conduct research in President Johnson’s archives,” Miller said. “Johnson was the first president to identify alcoholism as a disease and his administration laid the groundwork for the establishment of the National Institute for Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse (NIAAA). I hope to find information in his papers that will help me tell the story of how he came to view alcoholism as a high-priority public health issue.”

“US of AA” is a narrative history of how America’s understanding and treatment of alcoholism has evolved over the last 70 years. It tells the story of how our understanding of problem drinking and drug abuse changed from a matter of morality to one of pathology, how Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) became our nation’s de facto treatment policy for treating it, and how, in light of new science funded and led by the NIAAA, our understanding is changing once again, moving away from a singular reliance on AA toward an ever broadening array of medicines and therapy approaches that have proven success rates, Miller said.

Miller’s trip to Austin will be paid for by a Moody Research Grant, which is underwritten by The Moody Foundation of Galveston, TX. The LBJ Foundation awards a limited number of grants each year, and the selection process is highly competitive.

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Students ‘Break Bad’ to Build Good Writing Skills

Breaking Bad Student

Freshman computer science and Spanish major Thomas Wingate discussing casting and writing with classmates in Columbus State University’s “Breaking Bad and American Issues” course.


COLUMBUS, Ga.
— What adjectives best describe lead character Walter White’s mindset? Is there a conflict between how white- and blue-collar crime is viewed? What messages do the doorways, alleyways and the show’s music send?

English professor Sundi S. Rose ping ponged these emotionally charged questions to her students about critically acclaimed crime drama “Breaking Bad” as part of her modern, animated-styled English 1102 course: “Breaking Bad and American Issues.”

“This spring semester we watched Season 2 of ‘Breaking Bad,’” said Rose, a fast-talking teacher and pop culture professional writer. “My students have spent the semester learning how to watch and write about pop media. The course is about taking the text and analyzing it with a critical eye, and they’ve got it.”

The TV series follows White, played by Bryan Cranston. A chemistry teacher, White lives in New Mexico with his wife and teen. White is diagnosed with Stage III cancer and learns he has limited time to live, thus transforming from a meek family man to a kingpin of the drug world.

“It’s not your typical class — for sure,” said Thomas Wingate, freshman computer science and Spanish major of Cusseta, Georgia. “The class involves a lot of class collaboration and creative writing. She even tweets us discussions about ‘Breaking Bad’ and the dos and don’ts of writing.”

Throughout the series, Rose’s students have explored issues of gender politics; immigration; drug culture and legislation; feminism; toxic masculinity; the American economic recession and middle class; and health care.

“All while we talk about these topics,” said the Columbus native, “I’m sneaking critical thinking through the back door to help prepare them for future coursework across campus.”

The class setup is simple: Students subscribe to Netflix, watch episodes weekly and probe the show’s social issues during classroom discussions, group workshops and peer reviews.

“I’m not a strong writer,” said Rebekah Cherry, freshman early childhood education major of LaGrange, Georgia. “Well, I thought I wasn’t until I got into this class. I’ve really taken my writing from vague to specific, because she forces us to look at every detail and every angle of these episodes.”

The “Breaking Bad” course also includes three major papers, which involve the development of strong thesis statements, providing textual evidence and researching secondary sources to support claims.

Sundi Rose

Columbus State University English professor and pop culture writer Sundi S. Rose uses critically acclaimed crime drama “Breaking Bad” as part of her modern, animated-styled English 1102 course.


The class is just one of many innovative courses Rose teaches at Columbus State throughout the academic year.

Each semester her courses range from exploring the controversial musical work of artists Kanye West and Kendrick Lamar to blockbuster film “Straight Outta Compton” to Marvel’s TV series “Jessica Jones.”

“I watch anywhere between 35 to 40 shows,” said Rose. “I absolutely love TV and will watch anything once.”

In addition to pop culture, Rose’s courses at CSU focus on composition and Southern literature.

The freelance writer and critic blogs about pop culture and how it effects shared identities. Rose serves as a contributor to publications Entertainment Weekly, Hello Giggles, Daily Dot, Indiewire and PopSugar as well.

Her contemporary teaching techniques to English make students more apt to engage in classroom discourse after watching each episode.

“This course definitely changed my perspective on society,” Wingate said. “Just from watching the show and having open dialogue in class has helped my writing and understanding of the types of issues that affect and shape people.”

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Columbus State University Announces Carson McCullers Literary Award Winners


COLUMBUS, Ga
– The English Department at Columbus State University is pleased to announce the winners of the second annual Carson McCullers Literary Awards for Georgia high school and CSU students:


 

The Brick Road Greear Prize for Poetry

High School:
First Place: “Rotten Fruit,” Hayley Maine, Early College Academy of Columbus, Columbus, GA
Honorable Mention: “The Run of Life,” Bodie Fox, Armuchee High School, Rome, GA

CSU:
First Place: “In the Savage City,” Jeremy Andrews
Honorable Mention: “Proximity,” Alyssa Hudson


 

The Orlene Jones Poulsen Award for Fiction

High School:
First Place: “Thank You For the Pictures,” Elim Lee, Brookstone School, Columbus, GA
Honorable Mention: “6:30 to 7:41,” Taryn Castro, Chamblee Charter High School, Atlanta, GA

CSU:
First Place: “Tolerable Oranges,” Alyssa Hudson
Honorable Mention: “Midnight Monster,” Shannon Smith


 

The Paul Hackett Award for Creative Nonfiction

High School:
First Place: “Mother, Did You Know?” Elim Lee, Brookstone School, Columbus, GA
Honorable Mention: “Ode to Joy,” Amy Pan, Parkview High School, Lilburn, GA

CSU:
First Place: “Motherland,” Alyssa Hudson
Honorable Mention: “Escape These Southern Bones,” Jeremy Andrews


 

The Naartjie Multimedia Award for Expository Writing

High School:
Honorable Mention: “Grace’s Path to Enlightenment in The Others,” Sina Niusulu, Hardaway High School, Columbus, GA

CSU:
First Place: “Mark Doty and Transforming Experience into Art,” Christopher Delano
Honorable Mention: “Run, Lola, Run and the Reality of Difference,” Rachel Jordan
Notable: “Mina Loy’s “Parturition” and “Feminist Manifesto”: A Reflection of Conflicted Identities,” Alyssa Hudson
Notable: “The Negro Speaks: An Examination of Black Identity in America Through the Lens of Masculinity in Amiri Baraka’s Dutchman,” Brandon Hodges
Notable: “Damnation and Salvation Through Love in Christina Rosetti’s Poetry,” Emery Godwin


 

Prizes for first place include $150 and publication in Arden, CSU’s award-winning literary journal. Honorable mention win­ners will receive $100. Winners will receive their awards and cash prizes at a banquet at 6 p.m. on Monday, April 13 at The Rankin Gardens & Atrium. A performance featuring poet Noah Blaustein will follow at 7:30 p.m. in the Studio Theater at the RiverCenter for the Performing Arts.

These awards are named for Carson Mc­Cullers who was born Lula Carson Smith in Columbus, Georgia on February 19, 1917. Most famous for her novels “The Heart is a Lonely Hunter,” “Reflections in a Golden Eye,” “The Member of the Wedding,” “The Ballad of the Sad Cafe,” and “Clock Without Hands,” McCullers was also a playwright and a short story writer. Her small but significant body of work includes five novels, two plays, twen­ty short stories, over two dozen nonfiction pieces, a book of children’s verses, a small number of poems, and an unfinished auto­biography. She died in 1967 at the age of 50.

For further information about the awards, contact Dr. Carmen Skaggs, chair for the Department of English at 706-569-2583 or skaggs_carmen@columbusstate.edu.

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Internationally Acclaimed Poet to Visit Columbus

2014 PEN/Heim Award Will Read From Her Work at Carson McCullers Center for Writers and Musicians

 COLUMBUS, Ga. — Columbus State University’s Department of English will host internationally acclaimed poet, writer, editor, and literary translator Sholeh Wolpé to read from her work and answer questions on Friday, Feb. 6 at the McCullers Center at 4 p.m., followed by a reading at 7:30. Both events are free.

“Sholeh Wolpé’s visit is tremendous honor and opportunity for CSU and the Columbus literary community,” said Nick Norwood, CSU English professor. “In addition to winning many awards for her writing, she has translated into Arabic important literary works, including Walt Whitman’s Song of Myself.”

Born in Iran, Wolpé spent most of her teen years in Trinidad and the UK before settling in the United States. Now based in Los Angeles, she was recipient of the 2014 PEN/Heim award, 2014 Hedgebrook Residency, 2013 Midwest Book Award and 2010 Lois Roth Persian Translation prize, is the author of three collections of poetry and two books of translations, and is the editor of three anthologies.

The Poetry Foundation has written that “Wolpé’s concise, unflinching, and often wry free verse explores violence, culture, and gender. So many of Wolpé’s poems deal with the violent situation in the Middle East, yet she is ready to both bravely and playfully refuse to let death be too proud.”

Wolpé’s first collection, The Scar Saloon, was lauded by Billy Collins as “poems that cast a light on some of what we all hold in common.” Poet and novelist Chris Abani wrote:  “Sholeh Wolpé’s poems are political, satirical, and unflinching in the face of war, tyranny and loss. Talismanic and alchemical, they attempt to transmute experience into the magic of the imagined. But they also dare to be tender and funny lyrical moments.”

The poems in Wolpé’s second collection, Rooftops of Tehran, were called by poet Nathalie Handal “as vibrant as they are brave,” and Richard Katrovas wrote that its publication was a “truly rare event: an important book of poetry.”

Sholeh Wolpé and Mohsen Emadi’s translations of Walt Whitman’s Song of Myself (آواز خويشتنwere commissioned by the University of Iowa’s International Program. They are currently on University of Iowa’s Whitman website and will soon be available in print in Iran.

Wolpé’s anthologies have received critical acclaim, as well. Robert Olen Butler lauded Breaking the Jaws of Silence as “a deeply humane and aesthetically exhilarating collection.” The Forbidden: Poems from Iran and Its Exiles, a recipient of the 2013 Midwest Book Award, includes many of Wolpé’s own translations, and was called by Sam Hamil a “most welcome gift” that “embraces and illuminates our deepest human bonds and hopes.” Joy Harjo wrote, “What demon can withstand against these beautiful and truthful singers? What heart will not open when they hear these poems?”

Wolpé’s writings have been translated into several languages and her work is included in numerous American and international anthologies of poetry and fiction. She has taught poetry and literary translation at Stonecoast’s MFA program and has been featured and participated in many festivals, international programs, and university events.

Wolpé was a finalist in Glimmer Train’s 2006 Fiction Open and in addition to the 2014 PEN/Heim award, 2013 Midwest Book Award and 2010 Lois Roth Persian Translation prize, she has also been the recipient of the 2005 Peace through the Arts award as well as the  2004 Commendable Excellence award in poetry from Artists Embassy International, and The National League of American Pen Women’s Soul-making Literary Award in 2003.

For further information about the awards, please contact: Dr. Nick Norwood, CSU professor of English at 706-569-2507 or norwood_robert@columbusstate.edu

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Second Annual Carson McCullers Literary Awards For Student Writers

Cash Awards for High School and College Writers of Poetry, Fiction, Creative Nonfiction and Essay

Columbus State University’s Department of English will celebrate exceptional student writing this spring with the second annual Carson McCullers Literary Awards for Georgia high school and CSU students, offering $1,000 in cash awards and publication for the most outstanding poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction and expository writing. Sponsored by CSU’s English Department at Columbus State University, submissions will be accepted until Feb. 1.

“As the birthplace of such great authors as Flannery O’Connor, Alice Walker, Harry Crews and, of course, Carson McCullers, Georgia has a rich literary tradition, and we want to foster it for generations to come,” said Carmen Skaggs, chair of CSU’s English Department. “The Carson McCullers Literary Awards is an annual celebration of talent and skill, and it’s our hope that they’ll enrich the vibrant literary tradition in Columbus and across the state.”

Awards will be given in four categories:

  • The Brick Road Greear Prize for Poetry
  • The Paul Hackett Award for Creative Nonfic­tion
  • The Orlene Jones Poulsen Award for Fiction
  • The Naartjie Multimedia Award for Expository Writing.

Each cat­egory will have four awards (two for CSU students and two for Georgia high school students): First place includes $150 and publication in Arden, CSU’s award-winning literary journal; Honorable Mention win­ners will receive $100. Entries are due by Feb. 1, and winners will be announced in early March. On April 13, CSU will hold an awards reception and dinner featuring poet Noah Blaustein, during which the winners will receive their prizes.

Prose guidelines: 2,500-word limit, 12-point font, double-spaced. Po­etry guidelines: up to three poems.

Students may submit once in each cat­egory. There is no entry fee (students must either be registered for classes at CSU or attend a Georgia high school). En­tries must be submitted as Word or PDF documents through CSU’s website: english.columbusstate.edu

These awards are named for Carson Mc­Cullers who was born Lula Carson Smith in Columbus, Georgia, on February 19, 1917. Most famous for her novels The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, Reflections in a Golden Eye, The Member of the Wedding, The Ballad of the Sad Cafe, and Clock Without Hands, McCullers was also a playwright and a short story writer. Her small but significant body of work includes five novels, two plays, twen­ty short stories, over two dozen nonfiction pieces, a book of children’s verse, a small number of poems, and an unfinished auto­biography. She died in 1967 at age 50.

For further information about the awards, please contact: Dr. Carmen Skaggs, De­partment Chair, English at 706-569-2583 or skaggs_carmen@columbusstate.edu

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CSU Announces Carson McCullers Literary Awards Winners

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Columbus State University’s Department of English has announced the winners of its first-ever Carson McCullers Literary Awards for Georgia high school and CSU students.

Presentations were made at a ceremony held Tuesday night at the Chattahoochee River Club. The award winners are:

Winners of the 2014 Carson McCullers Literary Awards for Georgia high school and CSU students pose with CSU faculty and administrators after Tuesday’s awards ceremony.

Winners of the 2014 Carson McCullers Literary Awards for Georgia high school and CSU students pose with CSU faculty and administrators after Tuesday’s awards ceremony.

Brick Road Greear Prize for Poetry

  • High School Category First Place: “Where I am From,” by Bodie Fox, Armuchee High School, Rome, Ga.
  • High School Category Honorable Mention: “Star Gazer,” by Hayley Schroeder, Harrison High School, Acworth, Ga.
  • CSU Category First Place: “Kudzu,” by Morgan Lamberson
  • CSU Category Honorable Mention: “Chrétien’s Cup; A Journey of the Self,” by Jeremy Andrews

Naartjie Multimedia Award for Expository Writing

  • High School Category First Place: “Native Land,” by Katherine Russell, Colquitt County High School, Moultrie, Ga.
  • High School Category Honorable Mention: “Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried: War is Hell,” by Erin Bagley, Hardaway High School, Columbus, Ga.
  • CSU Category First Place: “Stephen Crane’s Maggie: Finding Meaning in Existence,” by Gavin Thagard
  • CSU Category Honorable Mention: “O Pioneers! and the Results of Social Structure to the Wild Lands,” by Sunshine King

Orlene Jones Poulsen Award for Fiction

  • High School Category First Place: “A Smile and a Nod,” by Katherine Dianne Hester, Richmond Hill High School, Richmond Hill, Ga.
  • High School Category Honorable Mention: “speak,” by Kathryn Flandermeyer, McIntosh High School, Peachtree City, Ga.
  • CSU Category First Place: “Salt Morning,” by Alyssa Hudson
  • CSU Category Honorable Mention: “Words of Amber,” by Sunshine King

Paul Hackett Award for Creative Nonfiction

  • High School Category First Place: “What’s in a Name?” by Amy Pan, Parkview High School, Lilburn, Ga.
  • High School Category Honorable Mention: “Big Ma,” by Jacquelyn Mallard, Telfair County High School, McRae, Ga.
  • CSU Category First Place: “Torn Pantyhose,” by Morgan Lamberson
  • CSU Category Honorable Mention: “Without the Sun,” by Shannon Smith

First-place winners in each category will receive $150, and their entries will be published in Arden, CSU’s award-winning literary journal. Honorable mention winners in each category will receive $100.

The awards’ namesake, Carson Mc­Cullers, was born Lula Carson Smith on Feb. 19, 1917 in Columbus. Best-known for her novels — The Heart is a Lonely HunterReflections in a Golden EyeThe Member of the WeddingThe Ballad of the Sad Cafe and Clock Without Hands — McCullers was also a playwright and a short story writer. Her body of work also includes two plays, 20 short stories, over two dozen nonfiction pieces, a book of children’s verse, a few poems and an unfinished auto­biography. McCullers died Sept. 29, 1967 at age 50. CSU’s Carson McCullers Center for Writers and Musicians, located in the author’s childhood home at 1519 Stark Ave., is dedicated to preserving her legacy.

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Winners of the 2014 Carson McCullers Literary Awards for Georgia high school and CSU students pose with CSU faculty and administrators after Tuesday’s awards ceremony.

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CSU English Department Establishes McCullers Awards for Student Writers

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Columbus State University’s Department of English today announced the first-ever Carson McCullers Literary Awards for Georgia high school and CSU students, setting a Feb. 1 deadline for inaugural entries.

“We’re thrilled to have an opportunity to support and showcase exceptional work by young writers,” said Carmen Skaggs, chair of CSU’s English department. “The Carson McCullers Literary Awards will be an annual celebration of talent and skill, and it’s our hope that they’ll help to foster a vibrant literary tradition in Columbus and across the state.”

The four awards that will be given in four categories are:

  • The Brick Road Greear Prize for Poetry
  • The Paul Hackett Award for Creative Nonfic­tion
  • The Orlene Jones Poulsen Award for Fiction
  • The Naartjie Multimedia Award for Expository Writing

Each cat­egory will have four awards: two for Columbus State students and two for Georgia high school students. First-place winners in each category will receive $150, and their entries will be published in Arden, CSU’s award-winning literary journal. Honorable mention win­ners in each category will receive $100.

Entries are due Feb. 1, and winners will be announced in early March. On April 1, CSU will hold an awards reception and dinner fea­turing poet and nonfiction writer Sandra Beasley. Winners will receive their prizes then.

Students may submit up to three works in the poetry category and up to 2,500 words in the other categories. Students may submit once in each category, using the online submission form that’s at the English department website, http://ColumbusState.edu/English. There’s no entry fee, but participants must be registered for classes at CSU or attend a Chattahoochee Valley or Georgia high school.

The awards’ namesake, Carson Mc­Cullers, was born Lula Carson Smith on Feb. 19, 1917 in Columbus. Best-known for her novels — The Heart is a Lonely Hunter, Reflections in a Golden Eye, The Member of the Wedding, The Ballad of the Sad Cafe and Clock Without Hands — McCullers was also a playwright and a short story writer. Her body of work also includes two plays, 20 short stories, over two dozen nonfiction pieces, a book of children’s verse, a few poems and an unfinished auto­biography. McCullers died Sept. 29, 1967 at age 50. CSU’s Carson McCullers Center for Writers and Musicians, located in the author’s childhood home at 1519 Stark Ave., is dedicated to preserving her legacy.

For more information about the awards, contact: Skaggs at 706-569-2583 or skaggs_carmen@ColumbusState.edu.

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CSU Students, English Professor Win Faulkner Studies Grants

Crystal WoodsCOLUMBUS, Ga. — Three Columbus State University students and a CSU professor are the winners of the Susan M. Cochran Memorial Scholarships for Faulkner Studies.

The grants will make it possible for Crystal Woods, a CSU assistant professor of English, and students Hannah Davis, AnnElise Pate and Amanda Woodruff to travel to the University of Mississippi’s annual Faulkner and Yoknapatawpha Conference in Oxford, Miss., on July 21-25. They will also have the opportunity to visit the home and grave of Pulitzer Prize-winning author William Faulkner.

CSU’s Faulkner studies scholarship was created in honor of Columbus resident Susan M. Cochran, who died in 2011, and her dedication to Faulkner studies.

The theme of this year’s conference is “Faulkner and the Black Literatures of the Americas,” featuring presentations from several major scholars.

Davis, a junior English and French language major, is interested in Southern literature, with a preference for women writers. She plans to become a research specialist, hoping to use this scholarship to advance her knowledge of Southern literature.

Pate, a senior Columbus native, is scheduled to graduate in December 2013 with a B.A. in English and secondary education. She plans to pursue a career in education.

Woodruff, scheduled to graduate in December 2013 with a B.A. in English and secondary education, studied at CSU’s Spencer House in Oxford, England during the summer of 2012. She’s been a student in CSU’s Servant Leadership Program for four years and is president of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars’ local group at CSU.

Woods, a LaGrange resident, has taught full time at CSU since 2002 and part-time since 1996. Woods teaches freshman composition, interdisciplinary arts and creative writing.  A poet, she was a 2009 Hambidge Fellow at the Hambridge Center for the Creative Arts and Sciences in Rabun Gap, Ga.

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Photo: Crystal Woods, assistant professor of English

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CSU Professor Captures Opera’s Influence on American Literature

carmen skaggs

COLUMBUS, Ga. — In Overtones of Opera in American Literature from Whitman to Wharton, Columbus State University English professor Carmen Skaggs explores the influence of opera on American writing, in both poetry and fiction.

The recently published book explores how major writers used opera in capturing the transformations of a rapidly changing American literary landscape during the 19th- and early 20th century.

The book begins with a brief history of opera in such cities as New Orleans, New York, and Boston, and then takes the reader through opera’s infiltration into literature in works by Walt Whitman, Edgar Allan Poe, Louisa May Alcott, Kate Chopin, Willa Cather, Henry James and Edith Wharton.

book jacket“There are sort of two threads to it,” Skaggs said. “I am interested in opera both as the art form itself and then as a cultural institution because by the time you get to books by James and Wharton, they are thinking about how opera is representative of cultural codes in higher society.”

Skaggs grew up playing the piano and singing, and had always been a lover of opera. As a Mercer University undergraduate, she initially majored in music and literature. However, when she began working on her master’s degree in English at the University of Georgia, she took a seminar course on Henry James and Willa Cather. “When I started reading their work, references to opera kept popping up,” she said. “It was something that I knew about, was interested in, and wanted to explore more.”

Skaggs started working her research into book form when Louisiana State University Press approached her to submit a proposal and abstract. She focused on opera’s infiltration into American literature since most of the research in this interdisciplinary field focuses on European literature.

Skaggs discovered opera began “flowering as an art form here at the same time that those writers are writing.” She believes that opera began infiltrating their writing because several of them, such as Whitman, Cather, and Poe, wrote reviews for journals and magazines.

She also discovered opera is represented differently in each author’s work. “Many of them will name specific operas, such as Whitman who cited Romantic Italian operas and Cather and Chopin who were primarily interested in Wagnerian operas,” she says. “However, it was also used to represent cultural forms and measure good taste, particularly in the late 19th century.”

Skaggs has carried over the work from the book into the classroom. In her comparative arts classes, she teaches opera as a literary and dramatic form. She finds it fun when students express surprise at discovering they like opera or realize that it has made its way into popular culture in music that they know.

For more information about the book, visit http://www.lsu.edu/lsupress/bookPages/9780807134917.html.

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Harvard Professor to Direct Writing Workshops

COLUMBUS, Ga. – A professor who has mentored new writing teachers for 30 years at Harvard University, will direct a series of workshops at Columbus State University on Tuesday, Oct. 7 to support CSU’s writing-focused Quality Enhancement Plan.

Nancy SommersNancy Sommers, right, who teaches writing for Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education, will direct a pair of workshops for faculty, one for students and another for staff of the CSU Writing Center.

The following interactive sessions will run through the afternoon:

• “Responding to Student Writing” faculty workshop, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Cunningham Center Blanchard Hall A. (RSVP to cummings_robert1@ColumbusState.edu.)

• Session for Writing Center consultants, 2:30-3:30 p.m., Woodall 116

• Student focus group, 3:30-4:30 p.m., Woodall 121 (RSVP to cummings_robert1@ColumbusState.edu)

• Faculty focus group, 4:30-5:30 p.m., Woodall 121

Topics in the opening faculty workshop will include “goals and purposes in commenting on student writing,” “student reactions to teachers’ comments” and “inspiring student action through more effective commenting.”

“Overall, Dr. Sommers will provide faculty training, as well as acknowledge the work we have already done to improve writing instruction at CSU, said QEP Program Specialist Bob Cummings. “The QEP is truly a campus-wide effort, involving all disciplines.”

Sommers, who for 20 years directed Harvard’s first-year writing program, is well known for her research into student writing. Her articles, “Revision Strategies of Student and Experienced Writers” and “Responding to Student Writing” are two of the most widely read and anthologized articles in the field.

She also is the lead co-author on the best-selling handbooks The Bedford Handbook, A Writer’s Reference, Rules for Writers and A Pocket Style Manual.

Cummings said Sommers’ visit reflects the growing stature of CSU’s QEP, as faculty members from other Southeast colleges and universities will travel to Columbus to participate in the workshops. “Our QEP effort is truly unparalleled in the region,” he said,

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English Prof to Speak to European Scientists

COLUMBUS, Ga. When Nick Norwood published A Palace for the Heart in 2004, he did not know this book of poems would lead him to appear two years later before one of Europes largest gathering of respected scientists.

Dr. Nick NorwoodNorwood, a Columbus State University English professor, will be featured in a dramatic presentation on his books subject, King Ludwig II of Bavaria, during the July 15-18 Euroscience Open Forum in Munich. This second annual event is staged and promoted as a science festival to bring together Europes leading scientists and interested members of the general public. Current issues related to scientific research are presented through exhibitions, symposia, talk shows and cultural events.

Ill be performing in a one-act play and reading one of my poems, which has been incorporated into the play, Norwood said.

Norwoods participation was solicited by one of the forums organizers, University of London physics professor Jean-Patrick Connerade, who as a poet under the name Chaunes, wrote the play especially for the event.

(Connerade) noticed my book when it came out and hes asked me to be in this performance, said Norwood, who will be joined on stage by French-German actress Sophie Daull and the French poet Sylvoisal.

The play is based on an interview with the ghost of Ludwig II, held in a visitation room of Purgatory, and conducted by two biographers. I play Biographer Number 1, added Norwood.

The performance will be part of a larger, special panel on Ludwig that Euroscience forum organizers have planned. Ludwig, one of Munichs most famous sons, also is known as the Mad King of Bavaria for what historians commonly cite as his unrestrained obsession for building extravagant castles three of them during his 1864-86 reign.

It turns out Ludwig also was interested in science and his famous castles employ what was at the time the very latest in technology, said Norwood, who also has been invited to a reception on the first evening of the conference for honored guests, including Germany President Horst Khler.

The forum is a creation of Euroscience, a grass-roots scientific organization founded in 1997 with more than 2,000 members in 40 countries. This years forum is hosted by Wissenschaft im Dialog, a nonprofit group comprised of prominent German research-funding organizations, whose mission is to promote interaction and dialogue between scientists and the general public.

Norwoods appearance at the forum, coincidentally, will represent a break from a June 22-July 26 study abroad program in which he will teach literature at Schwabisch Gmund, Germany about 180 miles northwest of Munich.

Norwood joined the CSU faculty in 2002 and teaches a variety of writing classes. A 2006 CSU Educator of the Year finalist, he has published a second poetry book, The Soft Blare, and has additional works in progress including two novels and a collection of short stories.

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