Columbus State Names Longtime Professor Associate Provost

Dr. Ellen Roberts

Dr. Ellen Roberts

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Columbus State University Wednesday announced the appointment of Ellen Roberts, , a CSU education faculty member since 1987, as associate provost and vice president for academic affairs.

Roberts has been serving about a year as an interim assistant vice president for academic affairs.

In her new role as associate provost, Roberts will serve as director of the Graduate School and will have responsibility for coordinating distance learning at Columbus State.

Previously, Roberts has served as associate dean of the College of Education and Health Professions. She filled the role of interim dean for the 2010-2011 academic year. During her time in the COEHP, Roberts worked in several areas, including graduate education, distance learning, and accreditation. She played a key role in launching several online education programs, also serving as a member of the University System of Georgia task force that developed the Master of Education in Accomplished Teaching collaborative program with several other USG institutions.

Roberts has served for years on the University Curriculum Committee.

he earned her B.S. in health and physical education from Mississippi State College for Women (now Mississippi University for Women), an M.A. in physical education from the University of Alabama in Birmingham, and an Ed.D. in physical education from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Her professional career began as a high school physical education teacher and coach of volleyball, gymnastics, and track and field. She has also directed a preschool motor development program, coordinated women’s intramurals, served as program director for many summers at a private girls’ camp and, for most of her professional career, taught physical education and wellness at the university level.

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Author to Discuss Virginia Tech Tragedy, Campus Safety

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Lucinda Roy, an author with a unique perspective on the 2007 mass slaying at Virginia Tech, will offer a lecture at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 15 at Columbus State’s University Hall auditorium.

Roy is the author of No Right to Remain Silent: What We’ve Learned from the Tragedy at Virginia Tech. which is the common reading assigned to all CSU freshmen this fall. Roy’s book (2009, Three Rivers Press) is a first-hand account of events leading up to the day 32 students and faculty were killed and 17 were wounded by a mentally deranged student, Seung-Hui Cho.

Cho, who committed suicide after law enforcement forced their way into the building where most of the massacre occurred, was well known to Roy, a Virginia Tech English professor. She had taught him and tried repeatedly to get him help for his mental illness. At Columbus State, she’s expected to discuss mental health issues, the rights of individual privacy versus public safety, gun control and violence prevention.

 

Roy is an Alumni Distinguished Professor of English, former chair of the Department of English at Virginia Tech and recipient of the Commonwealth of Virginia’s Outstanding Faculty Award. She was selected by the Virginia Press Women’s Association as Newsmaker of the Year in 2009. She has been a guest on CBS Evening News with Katie Couric, Oprah, CBS’s Sunday Morning, andappeared inPBS and BBCdocumentaries. Her award-winning poetry, fiction and commentaries have appeared in many publications, including American Poetry Review, the New York Times, Chronicle of Higher Education and USA Today. She has also published two novels and two poetry collections, Wailing the Dead to Sleep and The Humming Birds.

Her Oct. 15 lecture, sponsored by CSU’s First-Year Experience Program, is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Terry Irvin, chair of CSU’s Department of Basic Studies, at 706-565-4015.

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Barineau Columbus State University’s 2013 Educator of the Year

Dr. Clinton BarineauCOLUMBUS, Ga. — Clinton Barineau has been selected Columbus State University’s 2013 Educator of the Year.

Barineau, an associate professor of geology in CSU’s Department of Eearth and Space Sciences, received the award during Friday afternoon’s 2013 Scholastic Honors Convocation on Columbus State’s main campus. Other top faculty honorees were professors Wayne Summers for faculty service and Nick Norwood for research and scholarship. The Faculty Cup, recognizing CSU’s top student for 2012-2013, went to biology major Benjamin Long.

Barineau, who joined the faculty of Columbus State in 2007, previously taught at Valdosta State University from 2001-2005. He earned his Ph.D. in geology from Florida State in 2009. His research focuses on the geologic evolution of the southern Appalachian Mountains and eastern North America, and his research results have been presented at national and regional meetings of the Geological Society of America. Barineau played a key role in the creation of the Earth and Space Sciences degree program, and he has taught a wide variety of courses, including Natural Disasters, Mineralogy, Igneous and Metamorphic Geology, Structural Geology and Geophysics-Tectonics.

Dr. Wayne SummersSummers, who came to CSU in 2002, currently serves as chair of CSU’s TSYS School of Computer Science. From 1995-2006, Summers served as a course director for the National Science Foundation’s Chautauqua Program at the University of Dayton, conducting workshops for nearly 500 faculty from across the United States, including a workshop on computer security sponsored by the National Security Agency.

Norwood’s third full volume of poetry, Gravel and Hawk, won the Hollis Summers Prize in Poetry, a nationwide contest, and was published by Ohio University Press in 2012. His other books are A Palace for the Heart (2004), The Soft Blare (2003) and the limited edition, fine press book Wrestle (2007). Norwood has been awarded an International Merit Award in Poetry from Atlanta Review. In October 2012, his poem “A.M.” was selected Poem of the Week by the PBS News Hour and published on its online blog Art Beat. At the Euroscience Open Forum, he has twice served as the sole poet to represent the United States (Munich 2006, Turin 2010). Norwood has also published critical articles, reviews, and interviews in peer-reviewed journals and scholarly books.

Long, also CSU’s Student Government Association president, will graduate this semester with a Bachelor of Science in biology, and he’s already won early admission to Mercer University’s School of Medicine. He’s been an active participant in Columbus State’s Servant Leadership Program, served as a mentor in the Sophomore Year Experience program and has been a longtime member of Beta Beta Beta, the biology honor society. Long balanced his campus SGA service with hours as a volunteer in the emergency room at Columbus Regional Medical Center and as a medical missionary to Mexico.

The USG Regents Teaching Excellence Award went to violin professor Sergiu Schwartz (College of the Arts), and the USG Regents Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Award was given to Edward O’Donnell (Turner College of Business). Kimberly Gill (College of Letters & Sciences) was awarded the William Chappell Graduate Faculty Award.

CSU Honors Program honors stoles were awarded to Michael Anderson, Hannah Carey, Zachary Edwards, James English III, Bolivia Hurtado de Mendoza, Emily Husted, Rachael Lambert, Candice Lawrence, Martha Newell, Donald Osborne, Matthew Perry, Emily Randall, Joanna Roberts, Samantha Worthy, Sydney Worthy and Caleb Zuiderveen.

Other top student honors, the Academic Recognition and Phi Kappa Phi Senior awards, went to history major Caleb Zuiderveen and astrophysics and planetary geology major Matthew Perry, respectively.

Recognized as new faculty emeritus designees are retired or retiring professors Jacqueline Konan (College of Letters and Sciences) and Rochelle Ripple (College of Education and Health Professions).

The following awards recognize top students in their respective academic programs:

College of the Arts
Studio Art: Benjamin Lee
Art Education, Undergraduate: Karen Ouzts
Art Education, Graduate: Laura Shirley
Art History: Shannon Smallman
Communication: Christina Kleehammer
Music: Kristen Meyers
Music-Presser Scholar: Brandon Smith
Theatre Arts: Grace Sechelski
Theatre Arts Education: Allison Honea
Theatre Arts Design/Technical: Shelbie Harris
Theatre Arts Performance: Stephanie Earle

Turner College of Business & Computer Science
Accounting: Rachael Lambert
Finance: Michael Anselm
Management: Katelin Masterson
Marketing: Ronald “Trey” Meares
Management Information Systems: Jessica Cooper
Master of Business Administration: Filip Cojbasic
Master of Science in Organizational Leadership: Kate Hargrove
WebMBA: Michael Van Bibber
Computer Science: Richard Pike
Applied Computer Science: Cedric Searcy
Games Computer Science: Joshua Benson
Information Technology: Brian Gibson
Applied Computer Science, M.S.: Touhid Ahmed 

College of Education and Health Professions
School Counseling, M. Ed.: Tammy Newman
School Counseling, Ed.S.: Shameika Worthy
Community Counseling, M.S.: Stacey McClellan
Educational Leadership, M.Ed.: William Cunningham
Educational Leadership, Ed.S.: Nancy Johnson-Barnett
Early Childhood Education Undergraduate: Jessica Todd
Early Childhood Education Graduate: Amberly Fahnestock
Middle Grades Education Undergraduate: Tracy Greenfield
Middle Grades Education Graduate: Carlos Thomas
English Education Undergraduate: Lindsey Mathis
English Education Graduate: Ray Malmgren
Mathematics Education Undergraduate: Marissa Merrell
Mathematics Education Graduate: Matt Redmond
Science Education Undergraduate: Carrie Ann Sharitt
Science Education Graduate: Azmathunnissa Azeem
Spanish Education Undergraduate: Raymond Jones
Social Science Education Undergraduate: Stanley Hayes
Social Science Education Graduate: Kelli Guest
Special Education Undergraduate: David Hicks
Special Education Graduate: Rachel Massey
School Library Media Graduate: Michelle Obert
Health & Physical Education Undergraduate: Darien Ellis
Health & Physical Education MAT.: Karissa Castillo
Health & Physical Education M.Ed.: Hurston Pittman
Exercise Science Undergraduate: Shayla Hewitt
Health Science Undergraduate: Meagan Fountain
Nursing BSN.: Tracy Bruce
Nursing R.N.-BSN.: Jennifer White
Nursing MSN.: Mandy Cranney

College of Letters and Sciences
Criminal Justice: Claire Oshinowo
Sociology: Katherine Garzone
English Literature: Elizabeth Lockhart
English Professional Writing: Sarah Harden
Creative Writing: Carlos Velazquez
Spanish: Raymond Jones
French: Sierra Johnson
History: Taylor Meek
Political Science: Jessica Canedo
Political Science – Mario Mion Scholar: Gerald Chichester
Master of Public Administration: Luiza Ramirez
George Stanton Biology Award: Benjamin Long
Ecological & Evolutionary Biology: Matthew Robinson
Cellular/Molecular Biology: Bolivia Hurtado De Mendoza
Organismic Biology: Martha Newell
Biology Education: Charles Cantrell
Principles of Chemistry: Jennifer Prophitt
Outstanding Chemistry Major: Huirui Washington
Excellence in Research- Chemistry: Chelsea Severin
Geology: Danny Redding
Physics: Matthew Perry
Engineering: Ntumba Muyima
Environmental Science: Elizabeth Dreelin
Mathematics: Brianne Moody
Psychology: Cheryl Kolb

Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities & Colleges
Angela Adams
Michael Anselm
Georgia Beard-White
Latorria Brown
Tiffany Butterfield
Jessica Canedo
William Carson
Pablo Colon
Erica Crumley
Nicole DeVries
Katrina Donald
Kevan Dorsey
Courtney Duncan
Adesikemi Ewedemi
Melissa Fellrath
Keandra Ferguson
Meagan Fountain
Melanie Gober
Ashlee Griffin
Lindsey Groenewald
Amy Guilmette
Hailey Hinson
Jonathan Johnson
Sierra Johnson
Jacob Jones
Raeann Kraft
Rachael Lambert
Candice Lawrence
LaQuarius Lesley
Milton Love
Mary Lyons
Kimberly McAfee
Tammy McBee
Rachel McDaniel
Andrew McNeal
Brooke Mobley
Derrick Mobley
David Mojica-Cruz
Stevan Parks
Rosa Patterson
Shoko Porter
Pamela Preer
Joseph Roberts
Carrie Rodgers
Ashly Rodriguez
Marcus Sands
Lindsey Schmidt
Malinda Shamburger
Carrie Sharitt
Yuka Styron
Johan Swanepoel
Jasmine Usher
Hannah Vongsavang
Carolin Weikard
Edward Williams
Shannon Wilson
Amanda Woodruff

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 Photos: Dr. Clinton Barineau, Dr. Wayne Summers, Benjamin Long (links go to high-resolution originals)

 

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Columbus State Student Honored at State Capitol

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Caleb Zuiderveen, a Columbus State University student, was recently honored by the Georgia General Assembly during its Academic Recognition Day.

Zuiderveen was among 31 University System of Georgia students selected for this honor.

In a letter from USG Chancellor Hank Huckaby, Zuiderveen was informed that he was chosen as, “the one individual who best represents the highest scholastic ideals of Columbus State University” and that his “outstanding academic achievements are well deserving of this special recognition.”

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University System of Georgia Receives $1 Million Grant for Effort at Columbus State

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Education agencies working to boost Georgia’s college completion rates received good news this week in the form of a $1 million start-up grant to develop an accelerated, primarily online bachelor’s degree. The degree also will allow students to be credited for the experience and skills they already hold.

The grant, from Next Generation Learning Challenges, a national initiative to improve college readiness and completion, led by Educause and principally funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, has been awarded to the University System of Georgia.

Columbus State University will develop the degree program scheduled to launch in the fall of 2013. University System officials said that the program should improve Georgia’s ability to provide access for those historically not as well served by higher education, especially low-income students and the young adult military population.

“As we work to meet the goals of Complete College Georgia, we must assure that college is designed to fit into the lives of students and not the other way round,” said University System Chancellor Hank Huckaby. “This national recognition acknowledges that the University System and Columbus State are capable of succeeding in the challenge to dramatically improve access and graduation, while maintaining the high level of academic quality and excellence expected.”

Part of the challenge will be to evaluate the program and to quickly expand those elements that work, with a goal of enrolling 5,000 students in the program within five years of the launch date.

The overall approach is a first for Georgia. The project is designed to integrate a number of important elements that all work together to help a student successfully earn the degree.

Officials indicate it is a very different approach from the typical online degree offered in the University System. The new degree will use an approach that allows students to work at their own pace, will shorten the time to earn the degree and recognize the existing skills and experience of the student. It will also allow students to take advantage of a very flexible schedule.

The program gives students a number of avenues that complement each other and are flexible to meet the unique needs of each student, such as on-line eight week courses, opportunities to create portfolios for credit, service learning and work that is self-paced to a student’s knowledge.

Students will advance through a series of key achievements, awarding a certificate credential within the first year, an associate’s degree before the end of year two, and the bachelor’s degree upon completion.

Columbus State officials said that this approach reinforces an individual’s motivation to progress through the complete program, increases the individual’s ability to find a position in the job market should they leave the program, and increases the ease of return and timely graduation should a student take a break from the program.

In addition to being able to enroll in a degree program without having to incur the expense of room and board at college, the degree will use technology to streamline the program, make it more cost-effective and provide an individualized learning experience.

For example, the degree will use an existing USG partnership with learning management provider Desire2Learn to provide faculty with tools to support students in real time. Personalized student support services also will be provided, based on successful models in the University System’s current online core curriculum, called eCore.

Finally, the USG will use educational open resources as a cost-saving tool. Columbus State will provide additional resources for low-income students, including notebooks in order for them to be able to access courses and supplementary materials at no cost.

“This work will provide a strong model for use throughout the University System and the rest of the country as we involve faculty in seeking to change how we deliver higher education while ensuring high quality programs,” said Columbus State University President Timothy Mescon.

“We simply have to work in a different way if we are going to give more Georgians access to the college degree programs that work for individuals and help them be competitive in this global economy in which some level of college completion is a necessity,” Mescon said.

Individuals who enroll in the degree will be students of Columbus State University and earn the degree from CSU.

The academic program builds on the growing success of CSU’s Department of Communication. A 2010 survey by the American Management Association found that employers highly value and evaluate staff based on “4C’s” — communication, critical thinking, collaboration and creativity.

Students graduating from the CSU program, as with graduates from other USG institutions, will be specially prepared to succeed in an increasingly unpredictable economy where those that can learn and adapt quickly in a variety of roles are more employable.

Columbus State graduates from the university’s current communication degree program have gone on to successful careers in sales and marketing, private, public and nonprofit management, public relations and other leadership positions.

For more information on the new degree program or NGLC, visit: http://nextgenlearning.org/grantee/board-regents-university-system-georgia.

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U.S. News and World Report Ranks Columbus State Among South’s Top Universities

COLUMBUS, Ga. — “Best Colleges” rankings released today by U.S. News & World Report magazine put Columbus State University among the Top 100 “regional universities” in the South for the first time.

Among public regional universities in the South, CSU ranks No. 46.

CSU President Tim Mescon welcomed the news, indicating that he believes the university has the potential to climb in the rankings.

Dr. Hrepic and students“We have made some great progress in the U.S. News rankings and have work to do,” Mescon said. “We will continue this relentless pursuit for perfection in all we do.”

Columbus State is listed as No. 91 in the South in the “Best Regional Universities” section of the magazine’s Best Colleges 2013 guidebook that goes on sale Sept. 28. U.S. News defines a regional university as offering a full range of undergraduate majors and master’s programs. Regional university rankings are divided into four geographic regions: North, South, Midwest and South. Information from the guidebook, plus other rankings information, are also online now at http://www.usnews.com/colleges.

That CSU ranking measures Columbus State against private universities as well as public schools. When compared to regional public universities in the South, Columbus State ranks No. 46.

U.S. News & World Report offered its first “America’s Best Colleges” report in 1983. Among the data examined this year as part of the rankings process are assessments by top officials at peer institutions, graduation and retention rates, faculty resources, student selectivity, financial resources and alumni giving.

Columbus State has taken a more methodical approach in recent years examining its progress in those areas and many others through its Office of Institutional Research and Effectiveness, which is a sub-unit of CSU’s Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. To see data organized by Sri Sitharaman, director of institutional research, visit http://ColumbusState.edu/ir. Sitharaman has handled the job of responding to U.S. News & World Report’s request for extensive data in recent years.

Columbus State has paid particular attention to one significant area of data in a series of reports tracking the percentage of students who enroll as freshman versus those who continue on to graduation. These Retention, Progression and Graduation rates — RPG for short — are also a focal point of Columbus State as part of Gov. Nathan Deal’s Complete College Georgia plan that asks technical colleges and University System of Georgia schools such as CSU to produce 250,000 more graduates by 2020. CSU this month detailed how it would work to produce about 200 more graduates each year for the next seven years.

One part of a strategic plan adopted by Columbus State in 2009 mentioned the university’s need to “pursue recognition/ranking in national publications,” with U.S. News & World Report mentioned specifically. Earlier this year, Columbus State established a Strategic Planning Commission to produce a new plan.

In ranking No. 91 as a “first tier” school among regional universities in the South, Columbus State tied with three other schools: Charleston (S.C.) Southern University, University of Louisiana at Monroe and the University of West Georgia. In the ranking of public regional universities, CSU ties with ULM and West Georgia at No. 46.

Mescon, who became president Aug. 1, 2008, indicated that Columbus State would continue working to improve itself as an institution attractive to students interested in achieving academic excellence, echoing the university’s “First Choice” recruiting ads.

We want Columbus State University to be your first choice,” he said. “Our commitment is to continue on this most important march to excellence and continue to benchmark with other universities in the region and across the U.S.”

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Caption: Zdeslav Hrepic, left, associate professor in CSU’s Department of Earth and Space Sciences, works with students Cameron McCarty and Marie Harber in a physics lab focusing on magnetic properties. (Photo by Roger Hart)

Media: High-resolution original version of photo

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Columbus State Among Public Universities Helping More Georgians Earn Degrees

quoteCOLUMBUS, Ga. — Gov. Nathan Deal’s initiative to increase the number of Georgians earning a degree reached another milestone today with the release of a report with specific plans by Columbus State University and other institutions in both the University System of Georgia and Technical College System of Georgia.

The plans detail how to meet the ambitious goal of adding an additional 250,000 postsecondary graduates to the state’s rolls by 2020.

For Columbus State University, that translates into a goal of increasing the number of students completing degree programs by 18 percent by the year 2020. This equates to 1,400 students within various programs or about 200 additional graduates every year for seven years.

As institutions begin to implement the plans, higher education officials point out that they will receive continued assistance to improve the plans and will be held accountable for progress.

“The plans are a signal of the immense effort to date, a renewed and strengthened focus on access and graduation, and a commitment to continue and expand the work over the coming years,” said Lynne Weisenbach, the USG vice chancellor who’s leading the system’s Complete College Georgia efforts. “Increasing Georgia’s college completion rate is not something that can be changed overnight and is about the learning process to continually improve and find what works.”

Weisenbach said that many USG efforts will have a positive affect on college affordability by shortening the time to degree, lessening the likelihood a student may temporarily stop taking classes and providing options so students may attend school while working, serving their country and raising a family.

University System of Georgia institutions have built upon localized partnerships with K-12 schools, technical colleges, businesses and foundations in developing the plans.

“This is about serving and working with the local community and in many cases Complete College Georgia gives institutions a new avenue to reach out and build on those relationships,” Weisenbach said.

In the executive summary of the Complete College Georgia plan, the authors noted that the campus plans address a number of components that, taken together, will work to increase access to college and college completion. These are:

  • Better data collection and analysis to identify strengths and areas for improvement as well as the needs of various regions and populations.
  • Increased partnerships with K-12 schools to improve college readiness for high school graduates.
  • Better access to college and graduation for all students.
  • Reducing the time to earn a college degree.
  • Developing new learning and instruction models.
  • Transforming remediation for students who need help.

At Columbus State, several initiatives are already under way.

“The governor’s initiative prompted us to take a close look at our processes, how we do things and what kind of barriers there are to students trying to access and complete our degree programs,” said Tom Hackett, CSU’s provost and vice president for academic affairs. “To come up with individual goals, groups from across campus met earlier this year under the leadership of our faculty center to develop new ideas and recommendations to support the goals of the governor and the Complete College Georgia plan to develop the innovators who create the jobs of the future”

Some of the plans for Columbus State University include:

  • Beefing up the Early College program, a partnership with Muscogee County School District to provide college courses for students in the Early College Academy of Columbus.
  • Increasing the number of highly-qualified secondary education teachers to meet the demand for  science, technology, engineering and mathematics teachers through the UTeach Columbus Program.
  • Establishing flexible course offerings to meet the needs of various student populations, including early morning and late evening courses; five- and eight-week offerings; and weekend courses.
  • Developing or revising articulation agreements with two-year and technical colleges to make for seamless transitions for students admitted to Columbus State.
  • Training faculty and staff to make use of new initiatives that identify and refer students in need of academic support.
  • Creating a “dashboard” to track data that will support Complete College Georgia and Complete College CSU initiatives.

“These initiatives are all part of our academic priorities to attract more academically qualified students, keep them in school, and enable them to graduate to successful careers,” Hackett said. “Complete College Georgia is consistent with what we have been doing, such as raising our minimum academic standards, and starting freshman-year experience classes. Ultimately, the students will benefit, but so will our community and our country because it is the universities and colleges that are at the heart of creativity and innovation that has driven the U.S. economy.”

The full Complete College Georgia report is available online at http://www.usg.edu/educational_access/documents/USG_Campus_Completion_Plans.pdf.

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Columbus State English Professor Wins Top Board of Regents Award

Dr. Susan HrachCOLUMBUS, Ga. —Susan Hrach, an associate professor of English at Columbus State University, has been notified that she’s the sole recipient of the 2012-2013 University System of Georgia Regents’ Scholarship of Teaching and Learning Award.

Annually, the USG’s Board of Regents considers nominations to recognize faculty from the 35 state colleges and universities they oversee for their work in teaching and as advocates of learning.

“I am really proud to represent CSU because of the culture of teaching that exists here,” said Hrach, who joined CSU’s faculty in 1999. “I am nurtured all the time by my colleagues, who are themselves excellent teachers.”

The USG award letter to Hrach said the selection committee was unanimous in its selection and told her, “The committee was most impressed by the strong letters of support that accompanied your portfolio. Your ability to use your discipline content as a means to teach critical thinking, and analysis skills, was clearly demonstrated through your pedagogical approach. Your ability to accurately assess a student’s culture shock prior to travel and then ask them to address those issues prior to travel was a most innovative technique.”

Hrach, a Marietta, Ga., native began teaching at CSU after finishing a Ph.D. in English at the University of Washington in Seattle. She earned an M.A. in English from the University of Alabama and a B.A. from the University of Notre Dame, where she studied German and spent a year abroad at the Universität Innsbruck in Austria.

Her research interests include Renaissance women writers, manuscript texts and translation studies. The courses she teaches most often are World Literature and Renaissance Literature, including Shakespeare. She recently returned from teaching a Columbus State course in Italy this summer. She’s also taught and conducted research several times as part of the CSU study abroad program affiliated with the university’s Spencer house in Oxford, England.

She recently was named director of CSU’s Faculty Center for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning, which coordinates fellowships, workshops, book discussion groups and other faculty resources.

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Vietnam Expert to Speak at CSU’s Freshman Convocation

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Maj. Gen. H.R. McMaster, commander of the Maneuver Center of Excellence at Fort Benning, will be the featured speaker at Columbus State University’s 2012 Freshman Convocation at 4 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 19 in University Hall.

The convocation is a tradition designed to officially welcome the university’s freshmen. Faculty will wear full academic regalia for the event, which will also include remarks by CSU President Tim Mescon, Student Government Association President Benjamin Long and chemistry professor Anil Banerjee, CSU’s 2012 Educator of the Year.

Sunday’s address by McMaster, author of Dereliction of Duty: Lyndon Johnson, Robert McNamara, The Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Lies that Led to Vietnam, will launch a year-long exploration of and reflection on the Vietnam War by Columbus State.

Throughout the year, the university will host a series of events  lectures, movies, exhibits and a CSU night at the National Infantry Museum  to better understand the era of war and civil unrest. The Things They Carried, a 1990 finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, is a common reading for all CSU freshmen, and students will hear from its author, Tim O’Brien, during a campus lecture in March, when O’Brien will also speak at the 2013 Southern Literary Festival hosted by Columbus State.

H.R. McMasterMcMaster, referred to by the Wall Street Journal in May as “arguably the Pentagon’s foremost warrior-scholar,” wrote Dereliction of Duty, his analysis of how and why the U.S. became involved in the war in Southeast Asia, as part of his thesis toward a Ph.D. in military history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The 1997 book focuses on central figures such as President Lyndon Johnson, Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, Gen. Maxwell Taylor, National Security Advisor McGeorge Bundy who McMaster says deliberately deceived the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Congress and the American public.

McMaster assumed command at Fort Benning June 13. Immediately before that, he served as commander of the Kabul-based Combined Joint Inter-Agency Task Force Shafafiyat (Transparency), one of three military agencies working to root out corruption in Afghanistan. Before that, he served as director of concept development and learning at the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command in Fort Eustis, Va. He previously served as commanding officer of armored Calvary units in Germany, Colorado, Southwest Asia and Iraq. He also served as an assistant professor of history at West Point from 1994-1996.

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Photo: Maj. Gen. H.R. McMaster (full-resolution original)

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Grant Establishes CSU Program to Help Students Manage Finances

COLUMBUS, Ga. Columbus State University has been awarded a grant that will establish a program to help students better manage their personal finances.

 

Higher One, which works with college business offices in managing services to students, announced the $3,000 grant award in mid-July. Tom Hackett, CSU’s provost and vice president for academic affairs, agreed to supplement the grant to provide a total of $4,000 to establish the Cody Counts program.

The program is the brainchild of Nicole de Vries, manager of academic data in the provost’s office. Working with CSU’s Office of Sponsored Programs and University Information and Technology Services, she applied last spring for the grant to establish Cody Counts. This is the second year that Higher One, which distributes financial aid refunds at CSU, has offered the grants to promote financial literacy.

The program will allow Columbus State to create a student Financial Literacy Council and accompanying website, and then stage workshops offering students advice on handling their finances. The council of current student workers will develop the workshops and related programs, personalizing their financial advice to apply to the Columbus area.

Student workers selected to participate will be paid, and it should be “a fun, productive, great professional experience for student workers to earn some extra cash for fall,” de Vries said.

The official kickoff meeting with project coordinators will be held soon, de Vries said, inviting participation by financially savvy faculty or staff. She can be reached at devries_nicole@ColumbusState.edu.

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Columbus State Playing Big Role in State Effort to Boost Graduate Numbers

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Going into the 2012-2013 academic year, Columbus State University will use more than $1 million from the state Board of Regents to specifically address institutional priorities designed to close the gap between the number of Georgians who have some type of college degree and what the state’s workforce will need in 2020.

That gap is being addressed statewide as part of Gov. Nathan Deal’s Complete College Georgia initiative, which guides the University System of Georgia and the Technical College System of Georgia to work together to increase the number of adults with certificates or degreeswhile maintaining qualityby 250,000 graduates over the next eight years.

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Ongoing work by Georgia’s public colleges and universities to increase college completion rates will get a boost in the upcoming year with $72.5 million in new funds. Deal and the General Assembly fully funded the university system’s enrollment formula and, as a result, all 35 institutions will receive new funding to strengthen programs serving the system’s almost 320,000 students.

Columbus State University is taking part in this initiative by increasing the number of science, technology, engineering and math educators in Georgia; by revamping the university’s retention processes; by increased military educational programs and research partnerships; and by better tracking all these efforts through analytics. Four new faculty positions are included as part of CSU’s priorities next year.

“Columbus State University has been working for several years already to develop the kinds of partnerships that are behind the Complete College Georgia initiative,” said Tom Hackett, CSU’s provost and vice president for academic affairs. “We greatly appreciate the state’s support and confidence that CSU is poised to make a mark in this effort.”

Hackett pointed to recent agreements as examples of how Columbus State is working to help more Georgians earn college degrees:

  • Columbus State is working with more than $2.4 million in federal grants to recruit math and science majors into a new teaching-degree program. Half the funding came via the U.S. Department of Education “Race to the Top” initiative, through Deal, designating Columbus State as one of three Georgia institutions selected to get federal funds to address a critical shortage of STEM teachers in Georgia. Columbus State is using its grant, up to $1.4 million over four years, to establish UTeach Columbus, modeled after a highly successful program started at the University of Texas at Austin in 1997.
  • For Fort Benning soldiers, Columbus State now offers nine credit hours toward two master’s degrees for completion of the Maneuver Captains Career Course. The programs are Master of Public Administration (Government Track) and a Master of Education in educational leadership. Additionally, CSU now offers a Bachelor of Arts in liberal arts degree with tracks in military and in global issues. Through this degree, non-commissioned officer can receive up to 18 credit hours toward a minor in military science and advanced leadership for completion of a senior leadership course.
  • Columbus State University and Columbus Technical College announced last week a partnership to offer nursing students a seamless transition from Columbus Tech’s associate degree in nursing program to Columbus State’s RN-BSN online degree program. Through the partnership, students will apply to both programs at the same time. After students have passed their clinical license exam and received their associate’s degree from Columbus Tech, they are fully admitted to the CSU online program.
  • Earlier this month, Columbus State finalized an agreement allowing students who successfully complete Associate of Science degrees in business or general studies at West Georgia Technical College to count much of their coursework toward bachelor’s degrees at Columbus State University.

“These agreements and partnerships provide students with important paths for transitioning within and across our systems of higher education,” Hackett said. “We’re trying hard to focus on those areas where we know we can excel and improve those areas that we know need attention, all in support of the state’s college completion goals.”

###

For more information contact:

Tom Hackett, Columbus State University provost and vice president for academic affairs, at Hackett_Paul@ColumbusState.edu

or

John Lester, Columbus State University assistant vice president for university relations, at JLester@ColumbusState.edu

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STEM Honors Campers Diving into Math, Science and More at Columbus State

COLUMBUS, Ga. Twenty-two  of the most promising high school juniors and seniors in Georgia and Alabama are living at Columbus State University over the next two weeks as they participate in a jam-packed agenda of learning activities at CSU’s first-ever STEM Honors Camp.

The camp’s participants, who moved into main campus student apartments on Sunday, will learn about careers in STEMscience, technology, engineering and mathematicsthrough research, field trips, hands-on activities, lectures and more. Funded by Pratt and Whitney, the Society of American Military Engineers, Texas Instruments and Cott Beverages, the camp is free to selected participants. The camp is also supported by a team of seven Columbus State students working as interns. The interns are paid from a National Science Foundation grant and by CSU’s Coca-Cola Space Science Center in hopes some of them will consider teaching in a STEM field.

“We’re excited about the opportunities that this camp presents, both for these gifted students and Columbus State,” said grant administrator Tim Howard, math professor and director of CSU’s Math and Science Learning Center. “More than anything, we want these teenagers to be aware of all the career and higher education paths available to them in these areas. We expect their experiences in astronomy, biology, chemistry, computer science and mathematics to be unlike any they have had in the past.”

More than 600 high schools in Georgia and Alabama were invited to nominate up to two rising juniors and seniors to participate in the STEM Honors Camp. Organizers then chose participants from the nominees. The two-week camp is one of several efforts by Columbus State designed to address the shortage of qualified teachers in STEM fields, both in Georgia and nationally.

Each of the high school students will be assigned to a small group that will do research guided by Columbus State faculty, staff and interns. Camp projects will be conducted in chemistry, growth of cancer cells, digital image processing, genetic algorithms, solar imaging and water quality.

Columbus-area corporations and other entities that rely on STEM research will also host the students, including Pratt and Whitney, Kodak, Columbus Water Works, Bayer MaterialScience and Cott Beverages. The students will also spend time at CSU’s Oxbow Meadows Environmental Learning Center and Coca-Cola Space Science Center. At CCSSC, students will have a front-row seat as the center hosts an international webcast related to Tuesday’s Transit of Venus, with the help of reports from CCSSC staff in Australia, the Gobi Desert in Mongolia and Bryce Canyon in Utah.

The camp, which CSU plans to offer annually for the life of its five-year grant, is a key component in the Columbus Region Academy of Future Teachers of STEM, funded by a $1.2 million NSF grant. CRAFT-STEM complements the UTeach Columbus program, started through a 2011 federal grant of $1.4 million as part of the U.S. Department of Education Race to the Top program.

For more information on the STEM Honors Camp and other components of CSU’s new emphasis, visit http://ColumbusState.edu/UTeach.

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New Agreement Eases Student Transfers from WGTC to Columbus State

COLUMBUS, Ga. Students who successfully complete Associate of Science degrees in business or general  studies at West Georgia Technical College will be able to count much of their coursework toward bachelor’s degrees at Columbus State University, thanks to an agreement signed recently.

articulation agreement signing

The schools’ top academic officers – Tom Hackett at Columbus State and Pat Hannon at WGTC – signed the agreement Thursday in a brief ceremony. It was also signed by the schools’ presidents.

The agreement signed Thursday supersedes an April 26, 2010 agreement signed by the school’s representatives that covered courses in several areas. WGTC’s recent move from the quarter system to the semester system that’s closer to that CSU follows was one reason for the new agreement. The new agreement is effective in spring 2013.

Officials from both schools said they were still working on follow-up agreements that would articulate other courses that would be accepted by Columbus State, with criminal justice expected to be the next degree where most WGTC credits would be accepted at CSU.

As part of Gov. Nathan Deal’s Complete College Georgia initiative, the University System of Georgia and the Technical College System of Georgia are working together to increase the number of adults with certificates or degrees, while maintaining a commitment to quality. Columbus State, for instance, developed in partnership with Columbus Technical College an “articulation agreement” that allows students completing the RN program at Columbus Technical College to have a clear pathway to encourage them to continue their education and complete the BSN program at CSU.

As noted in the 2012 Georgia Higher Education Completion Plan, “Articulation and transfer agreements provide students with important paths for transitioning within and across systems of higher education…While some steps have been taken to ensure general education course transfer between our two systems, it is important to offer even greater articulation in support of the state’s college completion goals.”

WGTC has campuses and classroom sites in LaGrange, Newnan, Carrollton, Greenville, Douglasville, Franklin and Waco.

For more information about admissions requirements and student life at Columbus State, visit http://ColumbusState.edu/students.

# # #

Caption for photo:

Tom Hackett, left, provost and vice president for academic affairs at Columbus State University, and Pat Hannon, his counterpart at West Georgia Technical College, sign an articulation agreement May 10 at Columbus State that will make it easier for students earning associate degrees in business and general studies at WGTC to transfer their credits, starting in 2013, to CSU, where they can go on to earn bachelor’s degrees. WGTC and Columbus State expect to coordinate other degree programs later.

Media: high-resolution version of photo

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New Agreement Eases Student Transfers from WGTC to Columbus State

COLUMBUS, Ga. Students who successfully complete Associate of Science degrees in business or general  studies at West Georgia Technical College will be able to count much of their coursework toward bachelor’s degrees at Columbus State University, thanks to an agreement signed recently. articulation agreement signing

The schools’ top academic officers – Tom Hackett at Columbus State and Pat Hannon at WGTC – signed the agreement Thursday in a brief ceremony. It was also signed by the schools’ presidents.

The agreement signed Thursday supersedes an April 26, 2010 agreement signed by the school’s representatives that covered courses in several areas. WGTC’s recent move from the quarter system to the semester system that’s closer to that CSU follows was one reason for the new agreement. The new agreement is effective in spring 2013.

Officials from both schools said they were still working on follow-up agreements that would articulate other courses that would be accepted by Columbus State, with criminal justice expected to be the next degree where most WGTC credits would be accepted at CSU.

As part of Gov. Nathan Deal’s Complete College Georgia initiative, the University System of Georgia and the Technical College System of Georgia are working together to increase the number of adults with certificates or degrees, while maintaining a commitment to quality. Columbus State, for instance, developed in partnership with Columbus Technical College an “articulation agreement” that allows students completing the RN program at Columbus Technical College to have a clear pathway to encourage them to continue their education and complete the BSN program at CSU.

As noted in the 2012 Georgia Higher Education Completion Plan, “Articulation and transfer agreements provide students with important paths for transitioning within and across systems of higher education…While some steps have been taken to ensure general education course transfer between our two systems, it is important to offer even greater articulation in support of the state’s college completion goals.”

WGTC has campuses and classroom sites in LaGrange, Newnan, Carrollton, Greenville, Douglasville, Franklin and Waco.

For more information about admissions requirements and student life at Columbus State, visit http://ColumbusState.edu/students.

# # #

Caption for photo:

Tom Hackett, left, provost and vice president for academic affairs at Columbus State University, and Pat Hannon, his counterpart at West Georgia Technical College, sign an articulation agreement May 10 at Columbus State that will make it easier for students earning associate degrees in business and general studies at WGTC to transfer their credits, starting in 2013, to CSU, where they can go on to earn bachelor’s degrees. WGTC and Columbus State expect to coordinate other degree programs later.

Media: high-resolution version of photo

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Banerjee Named Columbus State’s 2012 Educator of the Year

Anil BanerjeeCOLUMBUS, Ga. — Longtime professor Anil Banerjee Friday was named Columbus State University’s 2012 Educator of the Year.

Banerjee, an associate professor of chemistry, received the award during Friday afternoon’s 2012 Scholastic Honors Convocation on Columbus State’s main campus. Other top faculty honorees were English professors Pat McHenry for faculty service and Joseph Francavilla for research and

. The Faculty Cup, recognizing CSU’s top student for 2011-2012, went to chemistry major Claire EunHye Cho.

 

Banerjee, who came to CSU in 2005, has taught for nearly two decades, both in the U.S. and his native India. He’s been awarded more than $100,000 in grants from the University System of Georgia to offer workshops for middle school and high school chemistry and science teachers in Muscogee, Harris and Troup counties. In these workshops, he shares his method of inquiry-based instruction – having students learn by taking action and then asking questions, guided by teachers. He’s twice previously been an Educator of the Year finalist, in 2008 and 2011.

Pat McHenry

McHenry, also associate dean of the College of Letters and Sciences, joined Columbus State as an assistant professor of English in 1996.  He’s also served as associate dean, interim dean and acting dean of the former College of Arts and Letters. He has served as chair of two departments on an interim basis: Art, in 2004-2005, and Mathematics and Philosophy in 2011-2012. Among his many committee assignments, McHenry serves as chair of the University Curriculum Committee, which reviews proposals for new courses. Since 2005, he has participated in several study abroad programs in Italy and the United Kingdom.

Joseph FrancavillaFrancavilla, professor of English, has been teaching film and literature at Columbus State since 1987.  He’s a member of the Science Fiction Writers of America and the Science Fiction Research Association. In 1990 and 1991, he oversaw publication of  the university literary journal, The Spectrum, the forerunner of Arden, CSU’s current literary journal.  His poems and stories have appeared regularly in Arden since its first issue in 2000.

The top student honoree, Claire Eunhye Cho, is a senior chemistry major who has not only participated in a study abroad course on Andros Island in the Bahamas, but has also performed summer research at Columbia University and the University of New Hampshire. She’s a member of Phi Kappa Phi, the American Chemical Society honor society; Beta Beta Beta, the national honor society for biology; and the National Society of Collegiate Scholars. She has received Outstanding Awards from the Department of Chemistry and Phi Kappa Phi. She has also assisted with rebuilding work in New Orleans and as a hospital volunteer in Brazil.

Other top student honors, the Academic Recognition and Phi Kappa Phi Senior awards, went to communication major Hayley Henderson and theatre major Melora Slotnick,, respectively.

Recognized as new faculty emeritus designees are retired or retiring professors Dean Beverly Davis (University College), Ronald Kettering (business) and Thomas Loughman (business).

The convocation also recognized students for outstanding research and creative projects, plus graduating Honors Program scholars Neena Alex, Will Borin, Zachary Bryant, Claire EunHye Cho, Mark Davis, Cecilia Felix, Lindsay Grant and Melora Slotnick.

The following awards recognize top students in their respective academic programs:

College of the Arts

Studio Arts:  Nica Mendoza

Art Education, B.S.Ed:  Caroline Trotter

Art Education, M.Ed:  Inge Morrison

Communication:  Shane Hancock

Music: Zachary Bryant

Music-Presser Scholar:  Bogdan Dumitriu

Theatre Arts Award:  Hannah Carey

Theatre Arts Education Award: Melora Slotnick

Theatre Arts Design/Technical: Matthew Swindell

Theatre Arts Performance:  Stephanie Earle, Heather Pavik (tie)

 

Turner College of Business and Computer Science

Accounting:  Ryan Collins

Finance: Filip Cojbasic

Management:  Kenneth Hammonds

Marketing:  Haley Lyman

General Business: Philip Harike

Management Information Systems: Casie Jordan

Master of Business Administration: Joel Holcombe

Master of Science in Organizational Leadership: Kelli Parker

Computer Science:  Jesse Cape

Applied Computer Science Undergraduate: Jeremias Duarte

Games Computer Science:  Janice Hill

Information Technology: Courtney Tillery

Applied Computer Science Graduate Award: Mary House

 

College of Education and Health Professions

School Counseling, M. Ed.:  Laura Carr

School Counseling, Ed.S.: Denea James

Community Counseling, M.S.: Courtney Loving

Educational Leadership, M.Ed.: Amanda Wile

Educational Leadership, Ed.S.:  Jared Worthy

Curriculum & Leadership, Ed.D.: Ruth Bennett

Early Childhood Education Undergraduate: Amanda Hernandez

Early Childhood Education Graduate:  Patricia Brooks

English Education Undergraduate: Alia Spradlin

English Education Graduate: Mary Brugh

Mathematics Education Undergraduate: Joshua Alsup

Mathematics Education Graduate: Cristopher Houston

Middle Grades Education Undergraduate: Shannon Tosi

Middle Grades Education Graduate: Draveious Hurston-White

Science Education Graduate: Jaimie Gonzalez

Spanish Education: Nabila Ivaldi

Social Science Education Undergraduate: Rafael Torres

Social Science Education Graduate: Earl Barnett

Special Education Undergraduate: Dalecia Williams

Special Education Graduate: Sarah McFadden

Health & Physical Education Undergraduate: Rochelle Hemmer

Health & Physical Education Graduate: Lindsey Sharpe

Exercise Science: Peter Blickhahn

Health Science: Madeline Meadows

Nursing BSN: Breanna Miller

Nursing RN-BSN: Ashley Kennedy

 

College of Letters and Sciences

Criminal Justice: Tara Santoro

Sociology:  Sheila Downs

English Literature: Jonathan Sanders

English Professional Writing: Ausu Mayo

English Creative Writing: Robin Shuler

Spanish:  Aldo Mendoza

French:  Kevin White

History:  Stanley Hayes

Political Science            :  Timothy Bussey

Political Science – Mion Scholar:  Madeliene Moore

Public Administration: Scott Balough

George Stanton Biology Award: Neena Alex

Ecological & Evolutionary Biology: Scott Whitley

Cellular/Molecular Biology: Hemalata Mandiga

Organismic Biology: Shannon Tyler

Biology Education: Carrie Ann Sharitt

Principles of Chemistry: Angelin Shajan

Chemistry Major: Michael Anderson

Excellence in Research:  Claire EunHye Cho

Geology: Donald Osborne

Physics:  Zachary Edwards

Engineering:  Marie Harber

Environmental Science: Alicia Garcia

Mathematics:  Alan Hetzel

Philosophy:  Nathan White

Psychology: Ashley Shipp

Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges

Melanie Alexander

Chelsea Allen

Moniquia Alleyne

Sierra Anderson

Alicia Bailey

Chelsea Baker

Scott Balough

Latorria Brown

Michayala Bush

Tatum Butterfield

Yu-Ting Chen

John Dockter

Melissa Drawdy

Tracy Farley

Latoya Feliciano

Christopher Freeman

Rebecca Gaston

Liberty Gibson

Amber Gonzalez

Michael Green

Amanda Hannaburg

Adrienne Hart

Melanie Hart

Hayley Henderson

Bolivia Hurtado De Mendoza

Sierra Johnson

Candice Lawrence

Angelica Lewis

Benjamin Long

Lauren Love

Mary Lyons

Carla Martin

Madeliene Moore

Christopher Mulch

Kristan Mumpower

Cynlenthia Muniz

Amy Nerone

Laterika Peak

Gary Phillips

Mark Plagge

Shoko Porter

Ebony Ramey

Sheronda Richey

Jenise Santos

Tammie Marie Short

Regina Steed

Matthew Swindell

Etsubdenke Templier

Stephanie Thomas

Hannah Vongsavang

Lorrie White

Kelsey Williams

Avery Wolff

Amanda Woodruff

Sydney Worthy

Caleb Zuiderveen

# # #

Photos, from top:

Anil Banerjee, CSU’s 2012 Educator of the Year, works in a laboratory earlier this year. He missed Friday’s Scholastic Honors Convocation due to a family emergency.

Pat McHenry, Faculty Service Award recipient

Joseph Francavilla, Faculty Research and Scholarship Award recipient

Claire EunHye Cho, Faculty Cup recipient (top student honoree)

Media: High-resolution originals of Banerjee, McHenry, Francavilla, Cho

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Columbus State Spotlights Academic Excellence with Week’s Events

COLUMBUS, Ga. – Columbus State University will again recognize outstanding scholarship from its students and faculty from April 9-14 during its Academic Week of Excellence.

Beginning with CSU Tower Day, an exhibition of research and creative work from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday, April 10 in the Schuster and Davidson centers, the week also includes:

  • A Celebration of Student Writing, 12:30-2 p.m. Thursday
  • Scholastic Honors Convocation, 2-4 p.m. Friday
  • Kaleidoscope, the Schwob School of Music’s annual showcase concert, 7:30 p.m. Saturday

Tower Day, now in its third year, is CSU’s annual showcase of undergraduate research and creative endeavors that is the cornerstone of the Academic Week of Excellence. There will be 165 presenters and 75 projects on display. Students from all disciplines were invited to share their scholarly work.

CSU’s Honors Program students organize Tower Day and will help judge presentations for 10 separate awards to be presented three days later, during the Scholastic Honors Convocation.

Among the projects on display will be Thomas Rice’s Enhancing Awareness and Understanding by Applying Perceptual Mapping and Public Participation GIS: Safe Routes to School. This project collected student-generated data from Hannan Elementary School fifth-graders to help identify neighborhood problems that compromised safe routes to school. The project involved collecting, mapping, and analyzing data that would help school administrators meet the state’s Safe Routes to Schools standards.

Another standout project is Samantha Worthy’s Assessment of Heavy Metals in Lake Walter F. George in Alabama and Georgia. This study provided an assessment of metals such as chromium, cadmium, arsenic and lead in 12 water samples. Two rounds of sampling were conducted. Previous testing has shown metal levels in Lake Walter F. George exceed Environmental Protection Agency limits.

For more on the event, visit http://ColumbusState.edu/towerday/.

Celebration of Student Writing

Thursday’s fourth annual Celebration of Student Writing will showcase writing-based projects from various disciplines in the Student Recreation Center’s multipurpose room.

Resembling a science fair, students and their faculty mentors will display their work and answer questions from guests to demonstrate the significance of writing across disciplines, well beyond required first-year composition classes.

The event also is part of CSU’s accreditation-related Quality Enhancement Plan, Writing the Solution.

Student writing being shared culminates their work with QEP faculty fellows Greg Domin, political science; Mary Beth Hendricks, education; Andrée Martin, music; Gary Sprayberry, history; and Scott Wilkerson, English. These professors developed writing projects or enhanced existing projects to foster critical thinking and teach students how a given discipline defines itself.

“We have committed as an institution to improve writing at all levels across campus, and the work showcased at this event shows a unique view into writing,” said Angela Green, English professor, QEP specialist and director of the celebration.

“Last year, we had nursing, communication, theatre, English and computer science presentations,” Green said. “This year we hope to include some new disciplines to further dispel the idea that writing stops after first-year classes.”

The event is open to the public. For more information, contact Green at 706-568-2054 or green_angela1@ColumbusState.edu.

Scholastic Honors Convocation

The Scholastic Honors Convocation on Friday, April 13 in University Hall’s auditorium is Columbus State’s annual ceremony to recognize its Educator of the Year, Faculty Cup winner (top student honor) and other outstanding faculty and students, recognized by academic discipline. The convocation also honors faculty emeritus designees, Honors Program scholars and closes with a reception in the gallery space adjacent to the auditorium.

“This is a celebration of what we’re about, which is academics and academic excellence,” said Tom Hackett, provost and vice president for academic affairs. “It’s certainly one of the most well-attended events. It’s recognition of all the high performers in academics and our faculty members as well.”

Kaleidoscope

The music school’s event, in RiverCenter’s Heard Theatre, also is the only performance of the year involving all of its 240 student musicians. The students include award-winning soloists and comprise award-winning chamber ensembles. They perform in both capacities for the concert.

Participating ensembles include the CSU Philharmonic Orchestra, Wind Ensemble, Popular Music Ensemble, Chamber Singers, Jazz Band, Percussion Ensemble and Contemporary Music Ensemble. These groups will play from different locations throughout the theater, allowing one group to immediately begin performing after the preceding group finishes, creating a seamless musical experience for the audience.

For more information about the concert, call 706-649-7225 or visit http://www.ColumbusState.edu/music. General admission is $20. Contact the RiverCenter Box Office at 706-256-3612.

# # #

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Columbus State Spotlights Academic Excellence with Week’s Events

COLUMBUS, Ga. – Columbus State University will again recognize outstanding scholarship from its students and faculty from April 9-14 during its Academic Week of Excellence.

Beginning with CSU Tower Day, an exhibition of research and creative work from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday, April 10 in the Schuster and Davidson centers, the week also includes:

  • A Celebration of Student Writing, 12:30-2 p.m. Thursday
  • Scholastic Honors Convocation, 2-4 p.m. Friday
  • Kaleidoscope, the Schwob School of Music’s annual showcase concert, 7:30 p.m. Saturday

Tower Day, now in its third year, is CSU’s annual showcase of undergraduate research and creative endeavors that is the cornerstone of the Academic Week of Excellence. There will be 165 presenters and 75 projects on display. Students from all disciplines were invited to share their scholarly work.

 

CSU’s Honors Program students organize Tower Day and will help judge presentations for 10 separate awards to be presented three days later, during the Scholastic Honors Convocation.

Among the projects on display will be Thomas Rice’s Enhancing Awareness and Understanding by Applying Perceptual Mapping and Public Participation GIS: Safe Routes to School. This project collected student-generated data from Hannan Elementary School fifth-graders to help identify neighborhood problems that compromised safe routes to school. The project involved collecting, mapping, and analyzing data that would help school administrators meet the state’s Safe Routes to Schools standards.

Another standout project is Samantha Worthy’s Assessment of Heavy Metals in Lake Walter F. George in Alabama and Georgia. This study provided an assessment of metals such as chromium, cadmium, arsenic and lead in 12 water samples. Two rounds of sampling were conducted. Previous testing has shown metal levels in Lake Walter F. George exceed Environmental Protection Agency limits.

For more on the event, visit http://ColumbusState.edu/towerday.

Celebration of Student Writing

Thursday’s fourth annual Celebration of Student Writing will showcase writing-based projects from various disciplines in the Student Recreation Center’s multipurpose room.

Resembling a science fair, students and their faculty mentors will display their work and answer questions from guests to demonstrate the significance of writing across disciplines, well beyond required first-year composition classes.

The event also is part of CSU’s accreditation-related Quality Enhancement Plan, Writing the Solution.

Student writing being shared culminates their work with QEP faculty fellows Greg Domin, political science; Mary Beth Hendricks, education; Andrée Martin, music; Gary Sprayberry, history; and Scott Wilkerson, English. These professors developed writing projects or enhanced existing projects to foster critical thinking and teach students how a given discipline defines itself.

“We have committed as an institution to improve writing at all levels across campus, and the work showcased at this event shows a unique view into writing,” said Angela Green, English professor, QEP specialist and director of the celebration.

“Last year, we had nursing, communication, theatre, English and computer science presentations,” Green said. “This year we hope to include some new disciplines to further dispel the idea that writing stops after first-year classes.”

The event is open to the public. For more information, contact Green at 706-568-2054 or green_angela1@ColumbusState.edu.

Scholastic Honors Convocation

The Scholastic Honors Convocation on Friday, April 13 in University Hall’s auditorium is Columbus State’s annual ceremony to recognize its Educator of the Year, Faculty Cup winner (top student honor) and other outstanding faculty and students, recognized by academic discipline. The convocation also honors faculty emeritus designees, Honors Program scholars and closes with a reception in the gallery space adjacent to the auditorium.

“This is a celebration of what we’re about, which is academics and academic excellence,” said Tom Hackett, provost and vice president for academic affairs. “It’s certainly one of the most well-attended events. It’s recognition of all the high performers in academics and our faculty members as well.”

Kaleidoscope

The music school’s event, in RiverCenter’s Heard Theatre, also is the only performance of the year involving all of its 240 student musicians. The students include award-winning soloists and comprise award-winning chamber ensembles. They perform in both capacities for the concert.

Participating ensembles include the CSU Philharmonic Orchestra, Wind Ensemble, Popular Music Ensemble, Chamber Singers, Jazz Band, Percussion Ensemble and Contemporary Music Ensemble. These groups will play from different locations throughout the theater, allowing one group to immediately begin performing after the preceding group finishes, creating a seamless musical experience for the audience.

For more information about the concert, call 706-649-7225 or visit http://www.ColumbusState.edu/music. General admission is $20. Contact the RiverCenter Box Office at 706-256-3612.

# # #

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CSU’s 2012 Hunter Lecture Features Critically Acclaimed Author

Gayle LemmonCOLUMBUS, Ga. — Columbus State University’s 2012 Hunter Lecture Series returns with a March 22 campus appearance by critically acclaimed author Gayle Tzemach Lemmon.

The public is invited to attend.

Lemmon, a former ABC News reporter, is the author of The Dressmaker of Khair Khana (2011, Harper Collins), a nonfiction account of how a female entrepreneur in Afghanistan enjoys success, defying the Taliban’s rise to power in the 1990s. She will address CSU faculty, students and the public at 12:30 p.m. Thursday, March 22 in the University Hall auditorium. A student forum precedes the lecture at 9:30 a.m., and a book-signing will follow the Hunter Lecture in the University Hall lobby.

Lemmon, who left ABC to earn an MBA at Harvard in 2004, was researching a story for Financial Times on unsung heroines who became successful entrepreneurs in conflict and post-conflict zones when she met Kamela Sidiqi, whose story is the focus of Dressmaker. Sidiqi, banished from Kabul’s streets by the Taliban and desperate to support her five brothers and sisters, started a dressmaking business in her living room that eventually offered work to 100 women in her neighborhood.

book coverLemmon, now a fellow and deputy director of the Women and Foreign Policy Program at the Council on Foreign Relations, spent three years interviewing sources for the book in Kabul, London and Washington. Before joining the council, a nonprofit think tank, she covered public policy and emerging markets for a global investment firm. Earlier, she spent nearly a decade with ABC News. including This Week with George Stephanopoulos. Her reporting on entrepreneurs in conflict and post-conflict regions has also appeared in the New York Times, International Herald Tribune and Christian Science Monitor, as well as the Daily Beast, Politico and Huffington Post.

A cross-section of faculty from CSU’s colleges and schools have met to pinpoint tactics to build interest in Lemmon’s CSU appearance. Some spring courses are requiring Dressmaker as a small-group reading. The Honors Program has scheduled HON 3000: Hunter Lecturer Book Club for its students.   Neal McCrillis, CSU’s Center for International Education director, has included Lemmon’s lecture among approved International Learning Community events this spring. Lisa Shaw, director of the Academic Center for Excellence, encouraged faculty to put the lecture on a short list of personal or professional development activities and then require students to participate in a certain number of events.

Terry Irvin, who coordinates the First Year Experience, compared the impact of the message in Lemmon’s book to that of Outcasts United, which freshmen read last fall before attending a lecture by the author, New York Times reporter Warren St. John.

The Dressmaker of Khair Khana, though very different in many respects, is yet another account of resourcefulness, spirit and resilience,” Irvin said.

The Hunter Lecture Series is made possible by a gift from Madge Hunter, in memory of her late husband, James W. Hunter. Previous speakers have included historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, radio host Garrison Keillor, children’s author Carmen Agra Deedy, paleoanthropologist Maeve Leakey and Nobel Prize winner Oscar Arias Sanchez.

# # #


Photos: Gayle Tzemach Lemmon (high-resolution original); cover of her book, The Dressmaker of Khair Khana (high-resolution original)
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CSU Names Tom Hackett as Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs

Tom HackettCOLUMBUS, Ga. Tom Hackett, interim provost and vice president of academic affairs at Columbus State University for the past year and a half, has been named to the position permanently, CSU President Tim Mescon announced Tuesday.

 

“It is with the greatest of pleasure that I announce the appointment of Dr. Tom Hackett as provost and vice president of academic affairs at Columbus State University,” Mescon said in an email to campus Tuesday evening. “In this capacity, Dr. Hackett serves as the senior vice president on the President’s staff.”

Hackett is a seasoned administrator and a longtime member of the CSU team, having served as a faculty member, chairperson of the Department of Counseling, Educational Leadership, and Professional Studies in CSU’s College of Education and Health Professions, as well as the director of CSU’s Graduate School. He played a key role in designing and launching Columbus State’s first doctoral degree program. He is both an alumnus of Columbus State University and a parent of a CSU student.

He holds both baccalaureate and Master of Education degrees from Columbus State University, an Education Specialist designation from Auburn University, and a doctorate from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Prior to joining the university faculty, Hackett was a high school teacher, principal, a system-level chief of operations, and a superintendent of schools in Phenix City.

“I’m really looking forward to working with our team,” Hackett said. “We have tremendous potential at this institution and I am looking forward to working with the faculty and staff to move the university forward.”

 He said some of the most immediate priorities will involve working on the university’s strategic plan, the completion of a salary equity study and working with faculty and staff in negotiating the changing landscape of higher education in Georgia.

Hackett was one of four finalists for the position who visited campus for a series of interviews. Mescon said feedback from the committee and others across campus greatly aided in making the final decision.

“Colleagues described Tom Hackett as one who is ‘self-aware and one who sincerely listens to others,’” Mescon said. “He has been described by CSU colleagues in this process as ‘sincere, genuine and authentic.’ A committee member observed that Dr. Hackett ‘greatly valued the role of staff at the University.’”

After serving for a brief period as an associate provost, Hackett was named interim provost in September 2010.

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Photo: Dr. Tom Hackett

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Four Finalists Named for Provost-Vice President for Academic Affairs

COLUMBUS, Ga. — Beginning next week, three external candidates and one internal applicant will undergo a series of interviews at Columbus State University – including two open forums for faculty, staff and students – during the final steps toward selecting a permanent provost and vice president for academic affairs.

 

More information on all the finalists can be found online at www.ColumbusState.edu/ProvostSearch. In order of their visits, the finalists are:

  • Nat Frazer, former dean of the College of Natural Resources at Utah State University, who will be on campus Wednesday, Jan. 11. Frazer will available  for the campus to meet him at 1 p.m. at Yancey Center at One Arsenal Place, room 114 or at 4 p.m. on main campus in the Center for Commerce and Technology auditorium. Frazer has two degrees from the University of Georgia, where he has also taught. He also taught at Mercer University, and was chair of the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation at the University of Florida.
  • Dale Ostlie, former dean of the College of Science at Weber State University in Utah, who will visit campus Wednesday, Jan. 18. He will available for the campus to meet him at 1 p.m. at Yancey Center at One Arsenal Place, room 114 or at 4 p.m. on main campus in the Center for Commerce and Technology auditorium. Ostlie, who has a doctorate in physics/astrophysics from Iowa State University, has been at Weber State since 1984. Additionally, Ostlie worked at Los Alamos National Laboratory.
  • Tom Hackett, CSU interim provost and vice president for academic affairs, who will interview on Thursday, Jan. 26. He will available for the campus to meet him at 1 p.m. at the RiverPark Campus (location TBA), or at 4 p.m. on main campus in the Center for Commerce and Technology auditorium. Hackett, who earned two degrees from Columbus State University before earning his doctorate from University of Alabama at Birmingham, has been at CSU since 2006 after retiring as superintendent of the Phenix City Schools. He’s been CSU’s interim provost and vice president for academic affairs since the former provost, Inessa Levi, resigned in September 2010.
  • Peter Millet, dean of the College of Education at Tennessee State University. He will be on campus on Thursday, Feb. 2 and will available for the campus to meet him at 1 p.m. at the RiverPark Campus (location TBA), or at 4 p.m. on main campus in the Center for Commerce and Technology auditorium. He has a doctorate in clinical psychology from Ohio State University and completed a predoctoral residency at Medical College of Georgia. He has been at Tennessee State University since 1997, after working also at Connecticut College and at Columbus State Community College in Ohio. 

David Lanoue, dean of CSU’s College of Letters and Sciences, is chairing the search committee that narrowed 51 applicants to the four finalists who will visit campus. He praised the committee’s work and said he was excited by the caliber of the applicants.

“We had an exceptionally strong pool of candidates, and our finalists are truly the best of the best,” Lanoue said. “I am proud of the hours of hard work done by the faculty, staff, and administrators who served on the search committee.”

After the candidates complete their campus visits, committee members will collect feedback from campus constituents to pass along to CSU President Tim Mescon, who will make the final selection.

More information about the committee and the applicants can be found online at www.ColumbusState.edu/ProvostSearch or by contacting David Lanoue at lanoue_david@ColumbusState.edu or (706) 569-3440.

Columbus State University Names Four Finalists for Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs


 Jan. 3, 2011


COLUMBUS — Beginning next week, three external candidates and one internal applicant will undergo a series of interviews at CSU – including two open forums for faculty, staff and students – during the final steps toward selecting a permanent provost and vice president of academic affairs.

In order of their visits, the finalists are:

·       Nat Frazer, former dean of the College of Natural Resources at Utah State University, will be on campus Wednesday, Jan. 11. Frazer will available for the campus to meet him at 1 p.m. at Yancey Center at One Arsenal Place, room 114 or at 4 p.m. on main campus in the Center for Commerce and Technology auditorium.

Frazer has two degrees from the University of Georgia, where he has also taught. He also taught at Mercer University, and was chair of the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation at the University of Florida. His full vita, as well as those of all the finalists, can be found online at www.ColumbusState.edu/ProvostSearch.

·       Dale Ostlie, former dean of the College of Science at Weber State University in Utah, who will visit campus Wednesday, Jan. 18. He will available for the campus to meet him at 1 p.m. at Yancey Center at One Arsenal Place, room 114 or at 4 p.m. on main campus in the Center for Commerce and Technology auditorium.

Ostlie, who has a doctorate in physics/astrophysics from Iowa State University, has been at Weber State since 1984. Additionally, Ostlie worked at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

·       Tom Hackett, CSU interim provost and vice president for academic affairs, who will interview on Thursday, Jan. 26. He will available for the campus to meet him at 1 p.m. at the RiverPark Campus (location TBA), or at 4 p.m. on main campus in the Center for Commerce and Technology auditorium.

Hackett, who earned two degrees from Columbus State University before earning his doctorate from University of Alabama at Birmingham, has been at CSU since 2006 after retiring as superintendent of the Phenix City Schools. He’s been CSU’s interim provost and vice president for academic affairs since the former provost, Inessa Levi, resigned in September 2010.

·       Peter Millet, dean of the College of Education at Tennessee State University. He will be on campus on Thursday, Feb. 2 and will available for the campus to meet him at 1 p.m. at the RiverPark Campus (location TBA), or at 4 p.m. on main campus in the Center for Commerce and Technology auditorium.

He has a doctorate in clinical psychology from Ohio State University and completed a predoctoral residency at Medical College of Georgia. He has been at Tennessee State University since 1997, after working also at Connecticut College and at Columbus State Community College in Ohio.

David Lanoue, dean of CSU’s College of Letters and Sciences, is chairing the search committee that narrowed 51 applicants to the four finalists who will visit campus. He praised the committee’s work and said he was excited by the caliber of the applicants.

“We had an exceptionally strong pool of candidates, and our finalists are truly the best of the best,” Lanoue said. “I am proud of the hours of hard work done by the faculty, staff, and administrators who served on the search committee.”

After the candidates complete their campus visits, committee members will collect feedback from campus constituents to pass along to CSU President Tim Mescon, who will make the final selection.

More information about the committee and the applicants can be found online at www.ColumbusState.edu/ProvostSearch or by contacting David Lanoue at lanoue_david@columbusstate.edu or (706) 569-3440.

Columbus State University Names Four Finalists for Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

Jan. 3, 2011

More information about the committee and the applicants can be found online at www.ColumbusState.edu/ProvostSearch or by contacting David Lanoue at lanoue_david@columbusstate.edu or (706) 569-3440.

  Columbus State University Names Four Finalists for Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs

Jan. 3, 2011

More information about the committee and the applicants can be found online at www.ColumbusState.edu/ProvostSearch or by contacting David Lanoue at lanoue_david@columbusstate.edu or (706) 569-3440.
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